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WHO IS…PATRICK CAULFIELD?

Posted 8 July 2015 by Kat

Let’s meet Patrick Caulfield!

Are you hungry? This painting is called ‘After Lunch’, 1975.

Patrick Caulfield, After Lunch 1975, © The estate of Patrick Caulfield

Patrick Caulfield, After Lunch 1975, © The estate of Patrick Caulfield

It is a picture of a restaurant. Do you think the artist might have been on holiday when he painted it? Can you see the man leaning in the doorway? Do you think he is waiting for the artist to leave?

Patrick Caulfield has painted the picture blue and in a cartoon style. But then he has done something strange. He has painted a realistic landscape scene on the wall. This is different to what you find in most paintings. The artist is playing with our ideas of what is real and what is not.

Patrick Caulfield is called a Pop artist because he painted everyday objects, like an empty wine glass or a bottle. He liked making paintings that were very flat, they look a bit like they have been printed rather than painted. To begin with he used household paints, the glossy kind that are sometimes used to paint walls or doors.

Here is a painting of a lampshade. It is very simple isn’t it?

Patrick Caulfield, Lampshade 1969, © The estate of Patrick Caulfield. All Rights Reserved, DACS 2015

Patrick Caulfield, Lampshade 1969, © The estate of Patrick Caulfield. All Rights Reserved, DACS 2015

But is it also a little bit mysterious. Can you see that the light from the lamp is not illuminating the darkness?

That is because Caulfield was interested in the Surrealist artists. They liked to put everyday objects together to make something playful and disturbing at the same time. Like this painting of some bananas by the surrealist artist Giorgio de Chirico. He mixes a traditional Greek sculpture of a body with some bananas! Strange eh? But it makes you think about something that is new and something that is old! Do you think that Patrick Caulfield was inspired by this painting to make his painting below? What are the similarities and differences in the paintings?

Giorgio de Chirico, The Uncertainty of the Poet 1913, © DACS, 2015

Giorgio de Chirico, The Uncertainty of the Poet 1913, © DACS, 2015

Patrick Caulfield, Bananas and Leaves 1977, © The estate of Patrick Caulfield. All Rights Reserved, DACS 2015

Patrick Caulfield, Bananas and Leaves 1977, © The estate of Patrick Caulfield. All Rights Reserved, DACS 2015

Caulfield studied art at the Royal College of Art in London in the early 1960s. He met other Pop artists there like Peter Blake and David Hockney. He was part of a movement that celebrated ordinary life, and painted scenes about it, and he inspired many other artists to do the same.

What would you draw or paint to show every day life? Is there something around you right now that might look a bit boring but actually could be a start of a very interesting story….?

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WHO IS…PETER BLAKE?

Posted 13 May 2015 by Kat

Meet Peter Blake. Do you like his badges?

Peter Blake, Self-Portrait with Badges 1961 © Peter Blake 2015. All rights reserved, DACS

Peter Blake, Self-Portrait with Badges 1961 © Peter Blake 2015. All rights reserved, DACS

There are lots of clues in this self-portrait that tell us about Peter. Which pop star do you think he likes? And where do you think he comes from?

Blake is wearing a denim jacket, jeans and baseball boots in his self-portrait. Lots of people wear clothes like that now, but in the early 1960s only young people in Britain dressed like this.

Peter Blake was born in Kent in 1932 and is sometimes called the Godfather of British Pop Art. This is because he was one of a group of artists in the 1950s who started to paint pictures and make sculptures about the things they liked. Like films, comic books, and pop music. A lot of the things they liked came from America.

Like this painting of the Beach Boys, who were a pop group from California who were very popular at the time. Pop artists also made art about objects that were mass-produced, like Coca-Cola and cornflakes. They wanted to celebrate the things we think of as ordinary and show that they could be art too.

Peter Blake, Beach Boys 1964 © Peter Blake 2015. All rights reserved, DACS

Peter Blake, Beach Boys 1964 © Peter Blake 2015. All rights reserved, DACS

Blake was seen as a radical artist who only painted new things. But actually, his paintings are very traditional and were inspired by artists like Samuel Palmer and William Blake who lived in the 1700s and many of his artworks were based on classical paintings by British artists like the Georgian painter Thomas Gainsborough.

In the late 1960s Peter Blake founded an art group called The Ruralists who wanted to paint pictures about the beauty and magic of everyday life. They left London and moved to the countryside where they hoped to create paintings that were joyful and inventive.

This picture was made while Blake was a Ruralist. It is one of a series of paintings based on Alice’s Adventures of Wonderland, which is a very magical book. All sorts of enchanting things happen to Alice. Blake used his daughter as the model for Alice.

Peter Blake ‘But isn’t it old!’ Tweedledum cried 1970, © Peter Blake 2015. All rights reserved, DACS

Peter Blake ‘But isn’t it old!’ Tweedledum cried 1970, © Peter Blake 2015. All rights reserved, DACS

Blake enjoyed living in the countryside, but he returned to London in 1979 after the Ruralists broke up.

But that didn’t stop him from looking for fantastical things in everyday life. This picture is called ‘I May Not Be a Ruralist Anymore but Today I Saw a Fairy in My Garden in Chiswick’.

What a fantastic name for an artwork! What else could this be called?

We applaud you Peter Blake for taking the ordinary and making is extraordinary!

Peter Blake, I may not be a Ruralist anymore, but this morning I saw a fairy in my garden in Chiswick 2008 © Peter Blake 2015. All rights reserved, DACS

Peter Blake, I may not be a Ruralist anymore, but this morning I saw a fairy in my garden in Chiswick 2008 © Peter Blake 2015. All rights reserved, DACS

PSSSST to all you guys that love Minecraft! We have a very special Minecraft map which includes Peter Blake’s Toyshop – check it out with a grown up and go play! 

What do you think of our homework helps? Have you used them for your homework? How could we make them better? Let us know in the comments below! 😉

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WHO IS . . . ROY LICHTENSTEIN?

Posted 22 March 2010 by Hannah

Roy Lichtenstein was born in New York City 1923. He became famous for his bold, Pop Art paintings of comic strip cartoons and everyday objects:

Interior with Waterlilies, 1991

Although best known as a painter, he worked in a variety of media: sculpture, murals, prints and ceramics.

 

Lichtenstein chose colours carefully, to imitate the four colours of printers’ inks. He also used Ben Day dots, a system invented to increase the range of colours available to newspaper printing. Look closely at his work – can you see how the colours are clear from a distance, but look like tiny dots close-up?

Explosion, 1965-6

Lichtenstein is famous for his use of cartoon strips from American comic books, which had a wide readership in the 1950s. He admired the skill of the comic book artist, who could create complex stories of love and war in cartoon form.

Lichtenstein was sometimes accused of copying comics exactly, but he stressed that he made changes to them – right down to the tiniest placement of individual dots. He was also criticized for using very basic painting techniques. What do you think about his artworks?

We really like Lichtenstein at Tate Kids so we have a game inspired by his art and he is also in one of our films. Check them out!

 

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WHO IS . . . ANDY WARHOL?

Posted 18 March 2010 by Hannah

Andy Warhol is your most favourited artist in My Gallery. Want to find out more about him? Read (and watch) on!

Andy Warhol was part of the Pop Art movement (check out the Pop Art film below!). He was famous for exploring popular culture in his work, using images of brands like Coca Cola, Listerine and Campbell’s Soup (which was one of his favourite things to eat):

© 2014 Andy Warhol Foundation / ARS, NY / TM Licensed by Campbell's Soup Co. All rights reserved.

Andy Warhol, Campbells’ Soup Cans, 1962  © 2014 Andy Warhol Foundation / ARS, NY / TM Licensed by Campbell’s Soup Co. All rights reserved. Source: MoMa

He liked to use bright colours and silk screening techniques to mass-produce artworks based on publicity photographs of stars, like this famous image of Marilyn Monroe:

Andy, Warhol, [no title] 1967. © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./ARS, NY and DACS, London 2014 License this image

Andy, Warhol, [no title] 1967. © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./ARS, NY and DACS, London 2014

Silk-screening is a process which can create lots of artworks/prints that look the same. The design is separated out into individual colours, and the position of each colour is marked out by a stencil. By pushing ink through the stencils one at a time, the colours build up to form a picture. Sometimes Warhol would switch colours around and present a group of prints with inverted or contrasting colours together:

Andy Warhol, Marilyn Diptych, 1962, © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./ARS, NY and DACS, London 2014 License this image

Andy Warhol, Marilyn Diptych, 1962, © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./ARS, NY and DACS, London 2014

Warhol’s studio was called The Factory, which was a reference to the mass-produced nature of his artworks. He saw art as a product, the same as a production line of Coca Cola bottles.

He had a very particular personal style. He had a shock of white/grey hair and was usually seen wearing a lot of black, leather jackets and glasses or sunglasses. Very striking!

Andy Warhol, Self-Portrait 1986 © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./ARS, NY and DACS, London 2014

Andy Warhol, Self-Portrait 1986 © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./ARS, NY and DACS, London 2014

Now you know about Warhol see his artwork in the gallery and find out more about Pop Art!

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