Tate Kids

TATE KIDS

 

Tate Kids Blog

Menu

Posts Tagged ‘craft’

DIY CHRISTMAS: Lolly stick sledge decorations

Posted 20 December 2016 by Kat

It’s the festive season. It’s cold outside. It’s time to get crafty!

Use all your saved up lolly sticks and make yourself a tiny 3D sledge! Just follow these really easy steps!

What you need:
Lolly pop sticks
PVA glue
Pegs
Paint and paintbrushes
String/ribbon

Step 1.

Glue 4 lolly pop sticks together. Keep them together by using pegs and leave to dry. Make the base of the sledge using 3 lolly pop sticks.

 

Step 2.

Check out some of the artworks on Tate Kids and take inspiration by some of the amazing artworks in the Tate Collection!

I chose some paintings to base my designs on, such as this Bridget RileyJackson Pollock, and Joan Miró!

Step 3.

After the paint has dried, glue in 2 other lolly pop sticks to make your sledge 3D! Keep these upright with more pegs and leave to dry.

Step 4.

Loop string or ribbon around the top of the sledge and hang up!

Feeling inspired? If you make your own sledge or any of your own Christmas crafts, we’d love to see them! Send us your pictures by emailing: kids@tate.org.uk, sharing them on My Gallery, or get a grown up to tweet @tate_kids!

Happy Holidays!

Tags: , , ,

2 comments, Add your comment »

WHO IS…THEASTER GATES?

Posted 13 April 2016 by Kat

What are the basics?

Theaster Gates was born in 1973 in Chicago, USA where he lives and works.

The things he creates may stretch the idea of what we think of as art. As well as sculpture, installation and performance…he performs makeovers on old buildings.

Theaster Gates, Building, 2012, Photo: Tanja Jürgensen

Theaster Gates, Building, 2012, Photo: Tanja Jürgensen

What’s it all about?

All of Theaster Gates’s art is about one thing – making people’s lives better.

He studied urban planning at college – which is the planning of buildings, road systems and neighbourhoods – and uses what he learnt from this to improve and revitalise poor areas of cities. He does this in lots of ways: from doing up old empty buildings so that they become something useful, to organising conferences and other events where people can meet to discuss ways of making society better.

Theaster Gates, Otis in the garden, 2012, Photo: Ellinor Lager

Theaster Gates, Otis in the garden, 2012, Photo: Ellinor Lager

This type of art is called socially engaged practice. Socially engaged artists collaborate with other people or communities to try and fix problems and improve people’s lives.

What is he most famous for?

Theaster Gates, Archive House Past (2009) and Present (2013) photos: Sara Pooley 2013

Theaster Gates, Archive House Past (2009) and Present (2013) photos: Sara Pooley 2013

Theaster Gates is most famous for his ambitious architectural projects. One of the biggest of these is The Dorchester Project. This is still happening, but began in 2006 when he bought an abandoned building in Chicago. He collaborated with a team of architects and designers to do the building up. This old empty useless building, (and others which he has worked on since then), has been transformed into an amazing, buzzing and very useful place where local people can do all sorts of fun and interesting things.

Theaster Gates, Visitors on swinging bench, 2012 Photo: Katherine Finerty

Theaster Gates, Visitors on swinging bench, 2012 Photo: Katherine Finerty

They can borrow books and music from a library, go to concerts and performances, meet others and share ideas and go on swings. Theaster Gates calls his architectural projects ‘real-estate art’.

What else do we need to know about his art?

Recycling is important to Theaster Gates. He describes his building projects as part of a ‘circular ecological system’. As well as recycling found materials for the renovation of his buildings; the building work itself is paid for entirely by selling sculptures and artworks he makes from old bits and pieces he finds inside the buildings.

His sculptures and installations, (as well as performance pieces) explore the history and culture of black people in America.

Let’s look closer…

This artwork by Theaster Gates looks a bit like an abstract painting doesn’t it? But it isn’t what it seems! Look closely; can you see what it’s made from?

Theaster Gates, Civil Tapestry 4, 2011, © Theaster Gates

Theaster Gates, Civil Tapestry 4, 2011, © Theaster Gates

As well as recycling, the work has another important message. Theaster Gates made the work about a shocking event that took place in Alabama in 1963. Young black school children were marching peacefully to demonstrate for equal rights, when fire hoses were turned on them. The powerful jets of water injured lots of the children. Theaster Gates uses the fire hoses to symbolise the horror of this awful event.

By using events from black history as subjects for his art, he wants to make sure people know about them so they don’t let them happen again.

Hungry for more?

You may not think of food as art…but in Theaster Gates’s hands it is. He, along with foodie collaborators, often cooks Sunday soul-food dinners for lots of different people.

Theaster Gates, Youth Dinner, 2012, Photo: Malin Bernalt

Theaster Gates, Youth Dinner, 2012, Photo: Malin Bernalt

Soul food originated in the Southern States of America in black communities, and as well as enjoying its delicious flavours, people discuss, question and celebrate the histories of the people associated with it. So it’s food for thought, as well as for the tummy.

Tags: ,

4 comments, Add your comment »

TOP 5 MOTHER’S DAY GIFTS

Posted 13 March 2015 by Kat

We all know it’s tricky to find that perfect gift for Mums on Mothering Sunday. Either way, we think the small, thoughtful and creative things are the best!

1. Breakfast in bed
There is nothing better than being in your pyjamas and having someone bring you tea and toast. Henri Hayden’s breakfast looks yummy! Are those waffles? What else could you put on this breakfast tray? Maybe you could have a go at making her favourite pancakes…she deserves it!

Henri Hayden, Brown Still Life, 1968 © ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2015

Henri Hayden, Brown Still Life, 1968 © ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2015

2. A performance
Do you like to sing or dance like these kids below? Sit your mum down, turn on the spotlights and dedicate a performance to her. Maybe a ballet or a dance routine to her favourite song? If you play an instrument you could write her a song? I think a set and decorations are needed like this Nigel Henderson photograph, what else could you use in your performance?

Nigel Henderson, Photograph showing a group of children performing to mark the Coronation, 1953, © Nigel Henderson Estate

Nigel Henderson, Photograph showing a group of children performing to mark the Coronation, 1953, © Nigel Henderson Estate

3. Flowers
Yes this is a pretty standard gift and may lack a bit of imagination…but who wouldn’t love to receive a bunch of their favourite spring flowers!? You could even make your own paper flowers! Jeff Koons made his out of glass! What other materials could you make a flower arrangement out of?

Jeff Koons, Mound of Flowers 1991, © Jeff Koons

Jeff Koons, Mound of Flowers 1991, © Jeff Koons

4. An ‘anything’ voucher
Every day is Mother’s Day really! So if everyone is busy and you can’t spend the day with your mum, design and send her a voucher to use whenever she wants! Be that a promise to wash the car or to go and pick up the newspaper from the shops. I’m sure it will come in handy! Make your voucher as pretty as possible, maybe use different coloured paper like this artwork below.

Patrick Caulfield, The Letter 1967, © The estate of Patrick Caulfield. All Rights Reserved, DACS 2015

Patrick Caulfield, The Letter 1967, © The estate of Patrick Caulfield. All Rights Reserved, DACS 2015

5. Your own masterpiece
The fridge door is looking a little empty. Why not make a collage about your Mum (or Grandmother as she’s a Mother too!) to stick on the fridge? Make a sculpture or paint a portrait. Whatever you think represents your mum the best! You could even make an artwork on Tate Kids and email it her with a Happy Mother’s Day message! We think she’ll love anything you make! 😉

We’d love to see and hear about what you are gifting your Mother with this Sunday! Email us or let us know in the comments below!

Tags: , , , ,

1 comment, Add your comment »

Textile Tryout 6: Textured Paint

Posted 9 March 2015 by Kat

Hi guys!

This is the 6th and final Textile Tryout! It’s been fun but we are now at the end of our Tuttle-inspired journey! We’ve been weaving and performing, we’ve been outside and in schools!

Our final tryout will be all about textures and painting! We’ll be looking closely at how artists use colour, design, textures, textiles and paint to make amazing artworks. Then you can have a go at making your own masterpiece!

Let’s go!

Artists mainly use canvases to create artwork on. Canvas is a strong, hard cloth made from hemp or yarn. It’s normally pulled across a wooden structure and then that’s what artists paint on.

But you could paint on any fabric or material, like cotton or velvet or metal or glass. What else could you paint onto?

Sigmur Polke used resin and acrylic paint on fabric to make the artwork below. Look at his strong mark-making. His paintings combine found printed images with painterly marks on top. What kind of found images could you use to paint on?

Sigmar Polke, Untitled (Triptych), 2002 © The estate of Sigmar Polke/ DACS 2015

Sigmar Polke, Untitled (Triptych), 2002 © The estate of Sigmar Polke/ DACS 2015

Lot of artists don’t use paint brushes to paint with either. Jackson Pollock (his artwork is below) dripped and poured paint over canvas. This meant he was able to work in a free way. He let all his thoughts and feelings out on the canvas.

Jackson Pollock, Yellow Islands, 1952, © ARS, NY and DACS, London 2015

Jackson Pollock, Yellow Islands, 1952, © ARS, NY and DACS, London 2015

This looks like fun! Sometimes artists use lots of different materials to make paintings. Here the artist Niki de Saint Phalle filled bags with paint and then asked people to shoot at them, so the paint exploded everywhere! This type of art was all about chance, you never really knew what it would look like before the end.

Niki de Saint Phalle, Shooting Picture, 1961, © The estate of Niki de Saint Phalle

Niki de Saint Phalle, Shooting Picture, 1961, © The estate of Niki de Saint Phalle

Then other artists would collage with different types of fabric. This artist made humorous decorated figures like this man below. He even used Meccano in this painting on top of fabric. What everyday objects could you use in your artwork?

Enrico Baj, Fire! Fire! 1963–4, © Enrico Baj

Enrico Baj, Fire! Fire! 1963–4, © Enrico Baj

So we have seen the use of canvas and fabric, collage and free-painting (without paintbrushes). Let’s see what happens when we put this all together is this tryout!

What you need:
A canvas
Paint (I chose 3 acrylic paints)
Extra fabric and materials
Everyday objects (these are going to be used instead of a paintbrush – I picked a toy car, a leaf, corrugated card, a spatula and a washing up brush)
Glue

Step 1: Grab all your materials. What would make a good object to spread paint and make interesting marks?
What colours would compliment each others? Or would you like your colours to clash and stand out?
What would be an interesting texture to paint on?

Step 2: Stick your fabrics onto the canvas to make a some interesting layers.

Step 3: Take some inspiration from other abstract artists who make marks and paint on fabrics. Maybe have a look at the artists on Tate Kids. Some favourites are Jackson Pollock, Sarah Morris and Frank Stella.

Step 4: Start painting! What kind of lines can you make with the paint? Can you get inspiration from around you in your house, or in the garden or in your street?

How does it feel to go over the fabric? Can you see the threads in it? Is it easy or hard to paint on?

Build up colours and patterns. Maybe let it dry a little before having another layer of paint. It’s ok to make slippages and spillages.

Step 5: Ta-dah! Your tryout is completed! If it’s a bit messy, that’s ok! Art is all about experimenting and being inspired! Have another go and see where it takes you!

It’s your final chance to have a go! So what are you waiting for?! We want to see what you make! Submit pictures of your artwork via email – kids@tate.org.uk – (or your parents, guardians and teachers can tweet it at us using #textiletryouts!) and then we will showcase a selection of your artworks here on Tate Kids and you can comment on the artworks made by other children all over the world! We have a few Terms and Conditions that go along with this which we’d recommend having a look at too.

Looking forward to seeing what you create!

Tags: , ,

No comments, Add your comment »