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TOP 5 SPACE INVADERS

Posted 15 December 2015 by Kat

Today Tim Peake will become the first British astronaut to live and work on the International Space Station! It’s a really exciting moment and we wanted to celebrate it on Tate Kids with our Top 5 artworks relating to all thing space!

We think art and science go really well together! They both need creativity, innovation and curiosity! We hope you are inspired by the artworks below to make your own space creations!

1. VALENTINA TERESHKOVA

Evelyne Axell with her work Valentine in 1967 Estate of Evelyne Axell © ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2015

Evelyne Axell with her work Valentine in 1967
Estate of Evelyne Axell
© ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2015

Artists have been inspired by space travel since the 1960s when the first astronauts went to space!

Here is the artist Evelyne Axell in the helmet on her portrait of Valentina Tereshkova. Valentina was the first woman to go in to space (and also the first civilian)! Evelyne’s artwork is political and challenges ideas of power and equality.

She uses a technique called Assemblage, which means she used different materials and objects on her canvas. Here she uses a space helmet and a zip. What else can you make art out of?

2. YURI GAGARIN

Joe Tilson, Transparency I: Yuri Gagarin 12 April 1961, 1968 © Joe Tilson. All Rights Reserved, DACS 2015

Joe Tilson, Transparency I: Yuri Gagarin 12 April 1961, 1968 © Joe Tilson. All Rights Reserved, DACS 2015

Yuri Gagarin was the first human to journey into outer space, when his spacecraft completed an orbit of the Earth in 1961.

The artist, Joe Tilson, was a British Pop artist. He was once a carpenter and made wooden and plastic constructions as well as prints and paintings. He often used children’s toys, bold colours and popular imagery to make his artworks.

3. ROCKETS

Sir Eduardo Paolozzi, Bash 1971, © The Eduardo Paolozzi Foundation

Sir Eduardo Paolozzi, Bash, 1971, © The Eduardo Paolozzi Foundation

To get to space you need a rather large rocket!  The Soyuz spacecraft, which Tim Peake will be on, weighs seven tonnes and sits on a 50 metre high rocket! Can you find the rocket in the artwork above?

Eduardo Paolozzi made this screen print. He has collaged lots of different imagery relating to space travel, new technology and the future. Have you made a collage before? What would this artwork look like if it were made today? What imagery would you use to make something about the future?

4. SPACE DUST

James Rosenquist, Space Dust 1989, © James Rosenquist/VAGA, New York and DACS, London 2015

James Rosenquist, Space Dust, 1989, © James Rosenquist/VAGA, New York and DACS, London 2015

What exactly is space dust?! What does it look like? James Rosenquist has had a go at what he thinks it looks like above.

Rosenquist is a painter and one of the leading American Pop artists. He places bizarre or weird imagery together to make his artworks. Like other pop artists, he mainly finds his imagery in adverts. He also uses materials like plastic sheets, mirrors, and neon lights. What kind of art would you make if it was meant to look like space dust?

5. MONUMENTS

Naum Gabo, Model for ‘Monument to the Astronauts’ c.1966–8 The Work of Naum Gabo © Nina & Graham Williams/Tate, London 2014

Naum Gabo, Model for ‘Monument to the Astronauts’ c.1966–8 The Work of Naum Gabo © Nina & Graham Williams/Tate, London 2014

This is a model made by Naum Gabo. As a sculpture, it was made to move and the neon tube would glow at night so it would look like a floating wave-like form. It would be a great sculpture to celebrate space travel! What monument would you make for astronauts? Maybe you could design it on one of the Tate Kids games!

3, 2, 1…blast off!

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Textile Tryout 4: Poetry Collage

Posted 21 January 2015 by Kat

Hi there, it’s Sarah here again! Welcome to the fourth Textile Tryout!

In this Textile Tryout we will be busy sewing, collecting words to make a chance poem, and using these things to make a collage.

You don’t need a sewing machine like this one shown in David Hockney’s print to sew, you can also do it by hand.

David Hockney, Woman with a Sewing Machine 1954 © David Hockney

David Hockney, Woman with a Sewing Machine 1954 © David Hockney

The mouse in this illustration by Beatrix Potter is showing you how to thread a needle (through the eye at the top of the needle). This will be useful for our Tryout!

Helen Beatrix Potter, The Mice at Work: Threading the Needle c.1902 c. Tate

Helen Beatrix Potter, The Mice at Work: Threading the Needle c.1902 c. Tate

To get some inspiration to make a chance poem, go for a walk. For example, go for a walk in a park like I did. Make yourself a viewing frame like the one I’m holding below. It is cut out from a piece of card and will help you look at your surroundings like an artist! Through my viewing frame I looked at these trees…

Viewing frame. c Sarah Sanders

Viewing frame. c Sarah Sanders

I wrote down some descriptive words that best described what I saw. For example, I wrote down tongue and eye because the shapes in the trunk of one of the trees reminded me of just that.

Whilst you are out, collect some things like twigs and leaves. You can use them in your collage.

Richard Long enjoys walking and often uses words in his artworks. Look at these words inspired from a 60 minute walk.

Richard Long, 60 Minute Walk 1990 © Richard Long

Richard Long, 60 Minute Walk 1990 © Richard Long

To make a chance poem for your collage, inspired by words you have collected, you could make a little story about your walk like I did. I typed my story on a computer and then printed it out. I then choose my favorite sentence and cut all the words out from that sentence and put them into a bag. I drew a word out from the bag, one by one, and laid them on my collage….

I’m getting ahead of myself! Let’s make the collage!

First steps

Final collage c. Sarah Sanders

Final collage c. Sarah Sanders

Richard Tuttle Two with Any To, #1, 1999 Photo: Tom Powel, courtesy Sperone Westwater, New York

Richard Tuttle Two with Any To, #1, 1999
Photo: Tom Powel, courtesy Sperone Westwater, New York

FINAL STEPS

We want to see what you make! Submit pictures of your artwork via email – kids@tate.org.uk – (or your parents, guardians and teachers can tweet it at us using #textiletryouts!) and then we will showcase a selection of your artworks here on Tate Kids and you can comment on the artworks made by other children all over the world! We have a few Terms and Conditions that go along with this which we’d recommend having a look at.

If you like this tryout, you’ll love our other ones too!

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Textile Tryout 2: Wrapping up the impossible!

Posted 18 November 2014 by Kat

Hi there, it’s Sarah here again! Welcome to the second Textile Tryout! This Textile Tryout is inspired by artworks that use textiles and found objects.

I’ve noticed a lot of textiles around Manchester (where I live) recently, covered over…

buildings…

cars…
car

and…what’s under that?
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I enjoy looking at textiles that are draped, hung and stretched over objects because they make new shapes. Artists like Christo and Jeanne-Claude enjoy using textiles in their work too. Look at this enormous artwork called Wrapped Reichstag.

Christo and Jeanne-Claude Wrapped Reichstag, Berlin, 1971-95. Photo: Wolfgang Volz © 1995 Christo Source: http://christojeanneclaude.net

Christo and Jeanne-Claude Wrapped Reichstag, Berlin, 1971-95. Photo: Wolfgang Volz © 1995 Christo Source: christojeanneclaude.net

The Reichstag building is in Berlin and its under all that cloth!  It took 100,000 square meters of silvery fabric and over fifteen kilometers (about 9 miles!) of blue ropes to wrap this up! The artwork was allowed to stay for two weeks in the summer of 1995. What an incredible sight that must have been!

Here are some other examples of artists using textiles wrapped over objects in their work at Tate.

Richard Tuttle I Don’t Know . The Weave of Textile Language 2014

Richard Tuttle I Don’t Know . The Weave of Textile Language 2014. Source: tate.org.uk

Phyllida Barlow untitled: dock: 5stockadecrates 2014 Photo: Alex Delfanne. Courtesy of the artist and Hauser & Wirth

Phyllida Barlow untitled: dock: 5stockadecrates 2014
Photo: Alex Delfanne. Courtesy of the artist and Hauser & Wirth

In my own work I have used textiles and found objects to create strange things too. This artwork uses a pair of tights and an old chair I found with it’s seat missing. I used stretching, pulling and weaving actions to create it.

Artwork by Sarah Sanders, Untitled, found chair and tights, 2007 Photography by © Alan Sams

Sarah Sanders, Untitled, found chair and tights, 2007
Photography by © Alan Sams

In the second activity for the Textile Tryouts, I’m going to show you how to make your own artworks using textiles and found objects. Read on and then try it for yourself!

steps

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Press play to see me making my artwork! I was really happy with my work at the end! Say Cheese!

tips

I’ve had a go at wrapping the moon! The moon inside is yellow by the way and I have drawn some cranes on it to help me with this impossible task. Hope you like it!

Wrapping up the Moon. A painting of the moon wrapped up, using paint, fabric, ribbon, sequins, glue and green sticky tape.

Wrapping up the Moon. A painting of the moon wrapped up, using paint, fabric, ribbon, sequins, glue and green sticky tape.

Now it’s your turn! Get involved in the second Textile Tryout!

Once you’ve taken a photograph of your performance, object or drawing, we want to see it!

You can email it us on kids@tate.org.uk or get a parent, guardian or teacher to tweet @tate_kids using the #textiletryouts

We will then showcase some of the work here on Tate Kids!

If you have any questions for Sarah or comments about the Textile Tryouts, let us know in the comments below.

Did you miss the first tryout? How could you!? Check it out!

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Textile Tryout 1: Out into the world

Posted 14 October 2014 by Kat

Hello my name is Sarah Sanders. I am an artist living in Manchester, UK and love combining text in live performances. Click on the picture below to see a video of me blowing on some letters I cut out of a newspaper a few years ago, for the Text Festival at Bury Art Gallery.

Sarah Sanders' Lettered Performance. Filmed by Geof Huth. 2011

Sarah Sanders, f e  ar, 2011. Filmed by Geof Huth.

For the Textile Tryouts I will be making 3 exciting activities you can try at home, in school or in your favourite place outside.

So what’s so special about text and what’s it got to do with art? Well, have you noticed how text….. is EVERYWHERE? You’re reading text right now, of course! It’s also on your packet of breakfast cereal, you can find it on posters you pass in the street and you can even find it flying above your heads, yes I’m talking about text on planes!

Here’s some text I get delivered to my house. Can you guess where this G came from?

 Artists love to use it too in their work. Check out these two artworks for example. This one has some newspaper in the picture …

Pablo PicassoBottle of Vieux Marc, Glass, Guitar and Newspaper 1913 © Succession Picasso/DACS 2014

Pablo Picasso Bottle of Vieux Marc, Glass, Guitar and Newspaper 1913 © Succession Picasso/DACS 2014

And this colourful text is actually painted by hand onto wood.

Bob and Roberta SmithMake Art Not War 1997 © Bob and Roberta Smith

Bob and Roberta Smith Make Art Not War 1997 © Bob and Roberta Smith

Some artists enjoy finding things that are already made in the world such as newspaper or text found on a signpost for example, and use them as materials for their own work. Have you seen Richard Tuttle’s Letters (The Twenty-Six Series)? I like them very much.

Richard Tuttle, 1966, Letters (The Twenty-Six Series), Nina and Gordon Bunshaft Bequest (by exchange) © 2014 Richard Tuttle. Source: MOMA, The Collection

Richard Tuttle, 1966, Letters (The Twenty-Six Series), Nina and Gordon Bunshaft Bequest (by exchange) © 2014 Richard Tuttle. Source: MOMA, The Collection

I used newspaper in my performance because I was questioning how stories are told in the media. Do stories in newspapers show the full picture? What do you think?

For the first activity of the Textile Tryouts, I’m going to show you how to make your very own text performance, inspired by text found around us.

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P1070790

SARAH3

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Sarahs TIPS

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Now it’s your turn! Get involved in the first Textile Tryout!  

Once you’ve taken a photograph of your performance, we want to see it!

You can email it us on kids@tate.org.uk or get a parent, guardian or teacher to tweet @tate_kids using the #textiletryouts

We will then showcase some of the work here on Tate Kids!

If you have any questions for Sarah or comments about the Textile Tryouts, let us know in the comments below.

You can also see the second textile tryout here!!! What are you waiting for! Go tryout! 

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TOP 5 SUMMER SPORTS

Posted 30 June 2014 by Kat

Watching Wimbledon and the World Cup makes us want to go outside and play!

The sunny weather, green parks and beautiful beaches make it very easy to grab some friends and start a game. We’ve picked some of our favourite artworks to inspire and illustrate the great outdoor games of summer.

5. CRICKET

After Louis Philippe Boitard, An Exact Representation of the Game of Cricket c.1760

After Louis Philippe Boitard An Exact Representation of the Game of Cricket c.1760

It feels as though we’re looking down from high on a hill! They are wearing some very fancy outfits to get messy in! I think we’ll stick to shorts and trainers.

4. BADMINTON

William Roberts, Study for ‘Shuttlecocks’,  c.1934. © The estate of William Roberts

William Roberts Study for ‘Shuttlecocks’ c.1934. © The estate of William Roberts

That’s a lot of people playing in a small space! I wonder how long they can keep bouncing the shuttlecocks off their rackets for?

3. BASKETBALL

Howard Kanovitz, Basketball Pinboard, 1969.  © DACS, 2014

Howard Kanovitz Basketball Pinboard 1969. © DACS, 2014

The artist here uses a collage technique to make his artwork. Maybe you could take pictures of you and your friends playing sports this summer and make a collage of your own.

2. BOULES

William Roberts, Study for ‘Boule Players at Etretat’ 1976. © The estate of William Roberts

William Roberts Study for ‘Boule Players at Etretat’ 1976. © The estate of William Roberts

These French men look like they are concentrating really hard on the game. Notice the grid lines on the artwork; I wonder if the artist drew them before or after he drew the scene?

1. TENNIS

Lucien Pissarro, Contentment,  1890 © The estate of Lucien Pissarro

Lucien Pissarro Contentment 1890 © The estate of Lucien Pissarro

Quick! Is she going to make it!? This piece is called Contentment. I think that perfectly describes what it feels like playing tennis on a warm afternoon in the park. Do you agree? Or is there a better word to describe this painting?

What is your favourite summer sport? Next time you see someone playing a sport maybe try to draw or paint them. Could you even make an artwork out of playing a game or some tennis rackets and basketballs?

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