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DIY CHRISTMAS: Lolly stick sledge decorations

Posted 20 December 2016 by Kat

It’s the festive season. It’s cold outside. It’s time to get crafty!

Use all your saved up lolly sticks and make yourself a tiny 3D sledge! Just follow these really easy steps!

What you need:
Lolly pop sticks
PVA glue
Pegs
Paint and paintbrushes
String/ribbon

Step 1.

Glue 4 lolly pop sticks together. Keep them together by using pegs and leave to dry. Make the base of the sledge using 3 lolly pop sticks.

 

Step 2.

Check out some of the artworks on Tate Kids and take inspiration by some of the amazing artworks in the Tate Collection!

I chose some paintings to base my designs on, such as this Bridget RileyJackson Pollock, and Joan Miró!

Step 3.

After the paint has dried, glue in 2 other lolly pop sticks to make your sledge 3D! Keep these upright with more pegs and leave to dry.

Step 4.

Loop string or ribbon around the top of the sledge and hang up!

Feeling inspired? If you make your own sledge or any of your own Christmas crafts, we’d love to see them! Send us your pictures by emailing: kids@tate.org.uk, sharing them on My Gallery, or get a grown up to tweet @tate_kids!

Happy Holidays!

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WHAT IS…OP ART?

Posted 3 June 2015 by Kat

Does this look funny to you? Does it make you feel a bit sea sick?

Victor Vasarely, Supernovae 1959–6, © ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2015

Victor Vasarely, Supernovae 1959–6, © ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2015

Well if it does, its probably Op Art.

Have you seen an Optical Illusion before? These are very similar. It’s all to do with geometry, shapes, colours and patterns and was started in the 1960s.

What shapes can you see in the painting below?

Victor Vasarely, Banya, 1964 , © ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2015

Victor Vasarely, Banya, 1964 , © ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2015

These artworks mess with your eyes and alter your perception of the artworks.

Some of the coolest Op artists are Bridget Riley, Jesus Rafael Soto, and Victor Vasarely. Look at the way they use colours and shape to change the way you see the 2D image? How do you feel when you look at these artworks?

Bridget Riley, Hesitate 1964, © Bridget Riley 2014. All rights reserved, courtesy Karsten Schubert, London

Bridget Riley, Hesitate 1964, © Bridget Riley 2014. All rights reserved, courtesy Karsten Schubert, London

Bridget Riley, Fragment 5/8 1965, © Bridget Riley 2014. All rights reserved, courtesy Karsten Schubert, London

Bridget Riley, Fragment 5/8 1965, © Bridget Riley 2014. All rights reserved, courtesy Karsten Schubert, London

Jesus Rafael SotoLight Trap 1965 © ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2015

Jesus Rafael Soto, Light Trap 1965 © ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2015

There are also some abstract artists that sometimes slip into Op art, like Frank Stella below. His colours are bright and jazzy! I wonder what this would look like in black and white?

Frank Stella, Untitled (Rabat) 1964, © ARS, NY and DACS, London 2015

Frank Stella, Untitled (Rabat) 1964, © ARS, NY and DACS, London 2015

Some of these artists involved movement into their artwork, which is sometimes called kinetic artwork. Julio Le Parc used mobiles in his work. You can see one of his images below. How do you think this would move in a gallery?

Julio Le Parc, Continual Mobile, Continual Light 1963 © ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2015

Julio Le Parc, Continual Mobile, Continual Light 1963 © ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2015

Pssst did you know we have an awesome exhibition in the summer at Tate St Ives called: Images Moving Out Onto Space which has some of the best Op artists in! Great stuff!

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WHO IS…BRIDGET RILEY?

Posted 14 April 2015 by Kat

Have a look at this painting. Does it make your eyes feel funny?

Bridget Riley, Fall, 1963, © Bridget Riley

Bridget Riley, Fall, 1963, © Bridget Riley

When Bridget Riley first exhibited her black and white abstract paintings in the 1960s, people were amazed at how they seemed to move. It was like she was painting with electricity and the patterns were live wires!

This style of painting is known as Op art, which is when the artist overlaps colours and patterns to make an optical illusion. This can make it look like its moving when you move!

Bridget Riley was born in 1931 in London, but when World War II broke out, she left the city and moved to Cornwall. She would walk along the coastline and explore the caves where she would sit and watch the reflections in rock pools. She also liked looking at the sea and how the light made it change colour during the day.

In 1960, she went to Venice where she saw sculptures by the Italian artist Umberto Boccioni. Here is one of his sculptures.

Umberto Boccioni, Unique Forms of Continuity in Space 1913, cast 1972.  c. Tate

Umberto Boccioni, Unique Forms of Continuity in Space 1913, cast 1972. c. Tate

Riley wanted to make paintings that had curves like Boccioni’s sculptures, like this one here.

Bridget Riley, Fragment 2/10 1965 © Bridget Riley 2014. All rights reserved, courtesy Karsten Schubert, London

Bridget Riley, Fragment 2/10 1965 © Bridget Riley 2014. All rights reserved, courtesy Karsten Schubert, London

She also started experimenting with colour, mixing warm and cold colours together, like red and blue, in order to make the paintings vibrant. She travelled to many different countries, like Egypt and India, and looked closely at the way the artists in those countries used colour. She was interested in the way hot countries used very bright colours to stop them fading in the sun.

This painting is called Nataraja and is inspired by a trip she made to India. Nataraja means Lord of the Dance, and refers to the Hindu god Shiva.

Bridget Riley, Nataraja 1993. © Bridget Riley 2014. All rights reserved, courtesy Karsten Schubert, London

Bridget Riley, Nataraja 1993. © Bridget Riley 2014. All rights reserved, courtesy Karsten Schubert, London

She thought this painting looked a bit like a dance too, with its diagonal lines and bright colours. Do you think it does? The composition of the painting is quite simple, just a lot of rectangles, but sometimes the simplest things can seem complex.

What do you think of Riley’s work? Do you think you could make some Op Art in Spin or Tate Paint?

Let us know in the comments! :)

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