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Calder Christmas Competition!

Posted 2 December 2015 by Kat

Ho ho ho!

Christmas is less than a month away and Tate Kids is running a very special Christmas competition this year! Be a detective and win a mega Alexander Calder themed Christmas hamper!

This hamper includes an A5 sketchbook, colouring pencils, an acrylic paint set, a Calder Gold Fish Bowl tote bag, a Calder cushion cover, Meet the Circus book AND an Alexander Calder mug (to hold that all-important hot chocolate!)

Christmas at Tate Shop!

It’s Christmas at Tate Shop!

This competition comes to you in 2 parts.

Part 1 – Zoom!

Below is a zoomed in bit of artwork and you have to guess which painting, out of the 3 below, it comes from.

Hand drawn Christmas card by Phyllis Maureen Gotch 1882-1963

A.

Julian Trevelyan, Christmas Card 1935, © The estate of Julian Trevelyan

Julian Trevelyan, Christmas Card 1935, © The estate of Julian Trevelyan

B.

Handmade Christmas card from Kenneth Armitage to Joan Moore inscribed ‘HAPPY CHRISTMAS’ 22 December 1951. © The Kenneth Armitage Foundation

Handmade Christmas card from Kenneth Armitage to Joan Moore inscribed ‘HAPPY CHRISTMAS’ 22 December 1951. © The Kenneth Armitage Foundation

C.

Hand drawn Christmas card date not known. © The estate of Phyllis Maureen Gotch

Hand drawn Christmas card, date not known. © The estate of Phyllis Maureen Gotch

Part 2 – Multiple choice!

Which one is the correct answer?

Alexander Calder was also known as what to his friends?

A. Pandy

B. Sandy

C. Santa

To get involved leave your 2 answers in the comments below with your first name, a contact email and home address.
We won’t publish anything but your first name and answers. We will use your email address to contact you on if you win and your address to send the prizes too.

Make sure you ask permission from your adults before entering. Please enter only once. The deadline is Sunday 13 December at 9pm. All the correct answers will be put into a random draw to pick a winner! All the other Terms and Conditions are here.

Good luck!

Don’t forget, you can visit the Alexander Calder exhibition over the holidays and, as always, its free for under 12s!

Happy Holidays!

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Kids review: Alexander Calder: Performing Sculpture

Posted 23 November 2015 by Kat

This review was written by Bella, age 11. Let’s see what she thought of the exhibition…

Alexander Calder was an amazing artist who produced pieces of art using wire and other materials. He was born on August 22nd 1898 and died on November 11th 1976. He was an amazing sculptor who made a lot of things, which you can now see in the Tate Modern, London.

It is cool because when you see his amazing work, you can make anything out of it from any angle you look at it from. So now I will share with you my experience at the gallery…

Me at the entrance to the exhibition with Alexander Calder!

Me at the entrance to the exhibition with Alexander Calder!

My heart was pounding, excitement pouring through me. Going to the Alexander Calder exhibition, of course I was feeling excited. As I walked in I wondered what delights were to treat me.

My amazing sister had got an audio guide and sometimes told me to listen.

Eve, 8, listening to the exhibition audio guide.

My sister, Eve, 8, listening to the exhibition audio guide.

First I saw Hercules and Lion

Alexander Calder (1898 - 1976), Hercules and Lion 1928, Calder Foundation, New York © 2015 Calder, Foundation, New York / DACS, London

Alexander Calder (1898 – 1976), Hercules and Lion, 1928, Calder Foundation, New York
© 2015 Calder, Foundation, New York / DACS, London

At first glance, it appeared to look like a man holding a lady. I moved, and discovered that when you moved to a different angle it looked different and so did its shadow. I found it captivating. That is why it is cool.

My anticipation mounted as I moved to the next piece, Medusa and her shadow hit my gaze, I saw her shadow and when I looked closely I saw snakes on her shadow. Amazing.

Alexander Calder (1898 - 1976), Medusa 1931, Wire 310 x 430 x 240 mm, Calder Foundation, New York © 2015 Calder Foundation, New York / DACS, London

Alexander Calder (1898 – 1976), Medusa 1931, Wire 310 x 430 x 240 mm, Calder Foundation, New York
© 2015 Calder Foundation, New York / DACS, London

Later I saw many pieces, which looked like our solar system. Then I started to think….

Alexander Calder (1898 - 1976) , A Universe 1934  Museum of Modern Art, New York © 2015 Calder Foundation, New York / DACS, London

Alexander Calder (1898 – 1976) , A Universe 1934
Museum of Modern Art, New York
© 2015 Calder Foundation, New York / DACS, London

Being autistic, I find things different from other people. The art that is here is mainly things stuck together, so what if I stuck a ball on a stick? Would it become famous art? Does all art even have a purpose?

The art is beautiful but mysterious, wonderful but strange. Is this good? In my books, it is cool and unique, so yes!

I have described some of the many pieces of art that the new exhibition holds, so go along and check it out for yourself!”

—-

Great reviews! Thanks so much Bella!

Alexander Calder: Performing Sculpture is on now and even free for Under 12s! Let us know what you think of Calder’s artwork below!

If you are inspired by Bella’s words and would like to review upcoming Tate exhibitions and events email us on kids@tate.org.uk or get a parent to tweet at us!

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