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DIY CHRISTMAS: Lolly stick sledge decorations

Posted 20 December 2016 by Kat

It’s the festive season. It’s cold outside. It’s time to get crafty!

Use all your saved up lolly sticks and make yourself a tiny 3D sledge! Just follow these really easy steps!

What you need:
Lolly pop sticks
PVA glue
Pegs
Paint and paintbrushes
String/ribbon

Step 1.

Glue 4 lolly pop sticks together. Keep them together by using pegs and leave to dry. Make the base of the sledge using 3 lolly pop sticks.

 

Step 2.

Check out some of the artworks on Tate Kids and take inspiration by some of the amazing artworks in the Tate Collection!

I chose some paintings to base my designs on, such as this Bridget RileyJackson Pollock, and Joan Miró!

Step 3.

After the paint has dried, glue in 2 other lolly pop sticks to make your sledge 3D! Keep these upright with more pegs and leave to dry.

Step 4.

Loop string or ribbon around the top of the sledge and hang up!

Feeling inspired? If you make your own sledge or any of your own Christmas crafts, we’d love to see them! Send us your pictures by emailing: kids@tate.org.uk, sharing them on My Gallery, or get a grown up to tweet @tate_kids!

Happy Holidays!

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Happy Halloween!

Posted 26 October 2016 by Kat

Creeeeeakkk….BOO!

Scared you right?! As you dress up as ghosts, witches and your favourite artworks (!?) we wanted to showcase some of the great Halloween-inspired creations made on the Games and uploaded onto My Gallery.

Get ready to be spooked!

Halloween By Marti from Norway

Halloween, By Marti from Norway

The Rising Dead, By Madz from Blackpool

The Rising Dead, By Madz from Blackpool

Pow, By Bez from New Zealand

Pow, By Bez from New Zealand

Haloween, By Mollie from England

Halloween, By Mollie from England

Monster, By Vicktoria from Norway

Monster, By Vicktoria from Norway

Hallowen, By White Angel from Norway

Halloween, By White Angel from Norway

Halloween, By Rutty Frutty, from Norway

Halloween, By Rutty Frutty, from Norway

We love seeing what you are making in the Games, keep up the spooky work!

Happy Trick or Treating guys!

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GIRL TALK: CORNELIA PARKER

Posted 25 November 2015 by Kat
Cornelia Parker, Cold Dark Matter: An Exploded View 1991 © Cornelia Parker

Cornelia Parker, Cold Dark Matter: An Exploded View 1991 © Cornelia Parker

Cornelia Parker, the artist, talks about her work:

“This piece came out of a series of works I was doing about cartoon deaths – things like, things falling off cliffs, things being run over by a steam roller, things being blown up, shot full of bullets, like Roadrunner or Tom and Jerry.”

Lisa LeFeuvre, writer and curator, interviewing Parker on her artistic style:

“There seems to be such an importance in your work…. not just on the experience of what we see, but also in terms of the ‘how’ of it…How did this piece of work get made?”

Anna, school girl aged 11 from London, reacts to Parker’s work:

“Wow! That’s crazy! There are so many bits! Where is the light coming from? I would love to be in it!”

There is loads more stuff to read and watch about Cornelia Parker’s work, so check that out! You can even find out how the exploded shed was made!

What do you think about Cornelia Parker’s work? Let us know in the comments below.

GIRL TALK looks at female artists through artworks and quotes from themselves, their friends, other people in the art world and kids just like you!

Quotes are from the  Audio transcript  of Cornelia Parker ‘Cold Dark Matter: An Exploded View’ and Talking Art: Cornelia Parker, 2008 at Tate.

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GIRL TALK: CINDY SHERMAN

Posted 12 October 2015 by Kat
Cindy Sherman, Untitled A 1975 © Cindy Sherman

Cindy Sherman, Untitled A 1975 © Cindy Sherman

Cindy Sherman, the artist, comments on her work:

“I think it’s more funny than scary”

Betsy Berne talks about her friend Cindy Sherman:

“Cindy and I first met years ago at a boxing gym, and when I asked our teacher, Carlos Ferrer, to describe her boxing style, he said without hesitation: ‘Fast and aggressive.’ In the ring, she reminds me of a pit bull terrier. When it comes to her work, she’s just as tenacious and ambitious”

Beth, school girl aged 10 from London, on Cindy Sherman’s work:

“It looks like me when I dress up in my Mum’s clothes”

What do you think about Cindy’s work? Let us know in the comments below.

GIRL TALK looks at female artists through artworks and quotes from themselves, their friends, other people in the art world and kids just like you!

Quotes from interview taken from ‘Studio: Cindy Sherman, by Betsy Berne, 1 June, 2003, Tate Articles.

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Textile Tryout 6: Textured Paint

Posted 9 March 2015 by Kat

Hi guys!

This is the 6th and final Textile Tryout! It’s been fun but we are now at the end of our Tuttle-inspired journey! We’ve been weaving and performing, we’ve been outside and in schools!

Our final tryout will be all about textures and painting! We’ll be looking closely at how artists use colour, design, textures, textiles and paint to make amazing artworks. Then you can have a go at making your own masterpiece!

Let’s go!

Artists mainly use canvases to create artwork on. Canvas is a strong, hard cloth made from hemp or yarn. It’s normally pulled across a wooden structure and then that’s what artists paint on.

But you could paint on any fabric or material, like cotton or velvet or metal or glass. What else could you paint onto?

Sigmur Polke used resin and acrylic paint on fabric to make the artwork below. Look at his strong mark-making. His paintings combine found printed images with painterly marks on top. What kind of found images could you use to paint on?

Sigmar Polke, Untitled (Triptych), 2002 © The estate of Sigmar Polke/ DACS 2015

Sigmar Polke, Untitled (Triptych), 2002 © The estate of Sigmar Polke/ DACS 2015

Lot of artists don’t use paint brushes to paint with either. Jackson Pollock (his artwork is below) dripped and poured paint over canvas. This meant he was able to work in a free way. He let all his thoughts and feelings out on the canvas.

Jackson Pollock, Yellow Islands, 1952, © ARS, NY and DACS, London 2015

Jackson Pollock, Yellow Islands, 1952, © ARS, NY and DACS, London 2015

This looks like fun! Sometimes artists use lots of different materials to make paintings. Here the artist Niki de Saint Phalle filled bags with paint and then asked people to shoot at them, so the paint exploded everywhere! This type of art was all about chance, you never really knew what it would look like before the end.

Niki de Saint Phalle, Shooting Picture, 1961, © The estate of Niki de Saint Phalle

Niki de Saint Phalle, Shooting Picture, 1961, © The estate of Niki de Saint Phalle

Then other artists would collage with different types of fabric. This artist made humorous decorated figures like this man below. He even used Meccano in this painting on top of fabric. What everyday objects could you use in your artwork?

Enrico Baj, Fire! Fire! 1963–4, © Enrico Baj

Enrico Baj, Fire! Fire! 1963–4, © Enrico Baj

So we have seen the use of canvas and fabric, collage and free-painting (without paintbrushes). Let’s see what happens when we put this all together is this tryout!

What you need:
A canvas
Paint (I chose 3 acrylic paints)
Extra fabric and materials
Everyday objects (these are going to be used instead of a paintbrush – I picked a toy car, a leaf, corrugated card, a spatula and a washing up brush)
Glue

Step 1: Grab all your materials. What would make a good object to spread paint and make interesting marks?
What colours would compliment each others? Or would you like your colours to clash and stand out?
What would be an interesting texture to paint on?

Step 2: Stick your fabrics onto the canvas to make a some interesting layers.

Step 3: Take some inspiration from other abstract artists who make marks and paint on fabrics. Maybe have a look at the artists on Tate Kids. Some favourites are Jackson Pollock, Sarah Morris and Frank Stella.

Step 4: Start painting! What kind of lines can you make with the paint? Can you get inspiration from around you in your house, or in the garden or in your street?

How does it feel to go over the fabric? Can you see the threads in it? Is it easy or hard to paint on?

Build up colours and patterns. Maybe let it dry a little before having another layer of paint. It’s ok to make slippages and spillages.

Step 5: Ta-dah! Your tryout is completed! If it’s a bit messy, that’s ok! Art is all about experimenting and being inspired! Have another go and see where it takes you!

It’s your final chance to have a go! So what are you waiting for?! We want to see what you make! Submit pictures of your artwork via email – kids@tate.org.uk – (or your parents, guardians and teachers can tweet it at us using #textiletryouts!) and then we will showcase a selection of your artworks here on Tate Kids and you can comment on the artworks made by other children all over the world! We have a few Terms and Conditions that go along with this which we’d recommend having a look at too.

Looking forward to seeing what you create!

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