Tate Kids

TATE KIDS

 

Tate Kids Blog

Menu
 

Textile Tryout 4: Poetry Collage

Posted 21 January 2015 by Kat

Hi there, it’s Sarah here again! Welcome to the fourth Textile Tryout!

In this Textile Tryout we will be busy sewing, collecting words to make a chance poem, and using these things to make a collage.

You don’t need a sewing machine like this one shown in David Hockney’s print to sew, you can also do it by hand.

David Hockney, Woman with a Sewing Machine 1954 © David Hockney

David Hockney, Woman with a Sewing Machine 1954 © David Hockney

The mouse in this illustration by Beatrix Potter is showing you how to thread a needle (through the eye at the top of the needle). This will be useful for our Tryout!

Helen Beatrix Potter, The Mice at Work: Threading the Needle c.1902 c. Tate

Helen Beatrix Potter, The Mice at Work: Threading the Needle c.1902 c. Tate

To get some inspiration to make a chance poem, go for a walk. For example, go for a walk in a park like I did. Make yourself a viewing frame like the one I’m holding below. It is cut out from a piece of card and will help you look at your surroundings like an artist! Through my viewing frame I looked at these trees…

Viewing frame. c Sarah Sanders

Viewing frame. c Sarah Sanders

I wrote down some descriptive words that best described what I saw. For example, I wrote down tongue and eye because the shapes in the trunk of one of the trees reminded me of just that.

Whilst you are out, collect some things like twigs and leaves. You can use them in your collage.

Richard Long enjoys walking and often uses words in his artworks. Look at these words inspired from a 60 minute walk.

Richard Long, 60 Minute Walk 1990 © Richard Long

Richard Long, 60 Minute Walk 1990 © Richard Long

To make a chance poem for your collage, inspired by words you have collected, you could make a little story about your walk like I did. I typed my story on a computer and then printed it out. I then choose my favorite sentence and cut all the words out from that sentence and put them into a bag. I drew a word out from the bag, one by one, and laid them on my collage….

I’m getting ahead of myself! Let’s make the collage!

First steps

Final collage c. Sarah Sanders

Final collage c. Sarah Sanders

Richard Tuttle Two with Any To, #1, 1999 Photo: Tom Powel, courtesy Sperone Westwater, New York

Richard Tuttle Two with Any To, #1, 1999
Photo: Tom Powel, courtesy Sperone Westwater, New York

FINAL STEPS

We want to see what you make! Submit pictures of your artwork via email – kids@tate.org.uk – (or your parents, guardians and teachers can tweet it at us using #textiletryouts!) and then we will showcase a selection of your artworks here on Tate Kids and you can comment on the artworks made by other children all over the world! We have a few Terms and Conditions that go along with this which we’d recommend having a look at.

If you like this tryout, you’ll love our other ones too!

Tags: , , , , , , ,

No comments, Add your comment »

Behind the scenes: Evelyn who? Interview

Posted 16 January 2015 by Kat

Ever wondered what its like to be an art critic? What question would you ask an artist if you could? Maybe you should ask Evelyn? Who’s Evelyn?

Exactly.

Knock Knock, Evelyn who? is a radio show presented by 10-year-old Evelyn Shlomowitz, sometimes live and other times as a sound installation over a weekend at Tate Britain. She also has a few adults helping her too, curator Nefeli Skarmea and composer Serge Vuille. It’s all very exciting.

Serge Vuille, Nefeli Skarmea and Evelyn Shlomowitz Knock Knock, Evelyn who? c. Tate

Serge Vuille, Nefeli Skarmea and Evelyn Shlomowitz
Knock Knock, Evelyn who? c. Tate

Evelyn will chat with artists over the weekend and will ask her own questions about what makes them tick. However now it’s time for Tate Kids to ask Evelyn a few questions of our own!

Hi Evelyn, We love all artists at Tate Kids, but do you have a favourite?

Hmm that’s hard. I really like Martin Creed, who I’ll be interviewing, and I really like René Magritte. One of my favourite artworks by Magritte is Empire of Light.

René Magritte Empire of Light (L'empire des lumières) 1953-54 C. Herscovici, London/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

René Magritte Empire of Light (L’empire des lumières) 1953-54 C. Herscovici, London/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Cool. Art means lots of different things to different people. What does art mean to you?

I think it’s a way of expressing yourself. You might have an idea behind the art you have made, but it’s also about letting people have their own opinion about it.

I like all forms of art, from cinema to books. I read a lot of Jacqueline Wilson and I really love Hitchcock films.

Evelyn on a visit to Tate Britain looking at Olafur Eliasson: Turner colour experiments. c. Nefeli Skarmea

Evelyn on a visit to Tate Britain looking at Olafur Eliasson: Turner colour experiments. c. Nefeli Skarmea

Creativity is important when making art. How do you stay creative?

I do lots of art projects at school and I am currently writing an adventure novel and poems at home. I also play the violin and the horn. I also like running events, including my little sister’s recent birthday party.

What was the last art project you made?

At school we’ve been doing a project about African masks from Benin in Nigeria. We have been looking at the animals on the masks and the different meanings the symbols have.

Sounds cool. Your parents are musicians. What do you think are the similarities and differences between music and art?

With music, unless there is a title, you have to imagine what it is about and what it looks like, but with art (like with sculptures or paintings) you can see what it’s about more easily.

You do lots of things outside of school! Do you know what you want to be when you grow up?

I want to be a social worker but write books and poems on the side. My friend is, and grandmother was one, so they are my inspiration.

We are excited to hear your radio show, is this your first time on the radio?

Yes, this is my first time. So far I’ve learnt how to use the microphone and record players, which was really fun. I’m looking forward to see what other people have to say. I’m really hoping that other kids come and ask their own questions too!

Testing! Testing! Evelyn in action! c. Nefeli Skarmea

Testing! Testing! Evelyn in action! c. Nefeli Skarmea

—–

We can’t wait to see what Evelyn gets up to! Come down to see Knock Knock, Evelyn who?, on Saturday 31 January – Sunday 1 February, as part of Radio City at Tate Britain.

Tags: , , ,

3 comments, Add your comment »

Textile Tryout 3: Weaving organic

Posted 9 January 2015 by Kat

Hello there and welcome to the 3rd Textile Tryout!

As I’m sure you know by now, the Textile Tryouts are inspired by the art installation in Tate Modern by the artist Richard Tuttle (where you can also take part in some weaving!). Tuttle loves textiles and this tryout will explore textiles and weaving.

If you look at your t-shirt you’ll see thread going up (that’s called the warp) and threads going across (that’s the weft). Pretty silly names, but super important when making materials. Look closely at the warp and weft of the artist François Morellet below.

François Morellet Two Warps and Wefts of Short Lines 0° 90° 1955–6 © DACS, 2014 c. Tate

François Morellet Two Warps and Wefts of Short Lines 0° 90° 1955–6 © DACS, 2014 c. Tate

You forget sometimes that clothes are something we use everyday! We wear them, get them dirty, wash them, and iron them all the time!

Nigel Henderson, Photograph of Jack Parnell with an unidentified woman [c 1949–c 1956] © Nigel Henderson Estate c. Tate

Nigel Henderson, Photograph of Jack Parnell with an unidentified woman [c 1949–c 1956] © Nigel Henderson Estate c. Tate

Have a look and see what people are wearing around you? All the shapes, sizes, designs and patterns. We can make rather boring things, pretty special.

Maybe you have too many clothes like Venus here! How big a pile could you make with all your clothes?

Michelangelo Pistoletto, Venus of the Rags 1967,1974 © Michaelangelo Pistoletto c. Tate

Michelangelo Pistoletto, Venus of the Rags 1967,1974 © Michaelangelo Pistoletto c. Tate

Your clothes are probably made by a machine called a loom. Maybe like this hand loom below. What a smart looking man with his moustache.

Albert Renger-Patzsch, Saxon Hosiery Weaver at a Handloom 1928–48 © Estate of Albert Renger-Patzsch / DACS 2014 c. Tate

Albert Renger-Patzsch, Saxon Hosiery Weaver at a Handloom 1928–48 © Estate of Albert Renger-Patzsch / DACS 2014 c. Tate

Anyway, to the tryout! We are going to make big organic woven structures (shapes you can find in nature, like shells or seeds) to celebrate textiles and weaving!

Textile Tryout 3: Weaving Organic!

What you need:

  • Chicken Wire (I would recommend getting a thin chicken wire. Its softer and can be molded easily)
  • Scissors
  • Lots of things to weave with: tissue paper, newspaper, felt, cotton, silk, film, magazines, wool, maps, anything!

Step 1: To make a seed shapes structure. Roll out your chicken wire about 2 metres by 2 metres (but you can make a bigger or smaller version and any shape you want). Make a roll out of it and then twist the top and bottom so you get a cylinder. Chicken wire can be a little sharp at the edges so I’d get a grown up to help you out here.

c. Tate

Chicken wire structure c. Tate

Step 2: Cut all your fabric into strips ready for weaving.

c. Tate

Lots of fabrics and weaving materials c. Tate

Step 3:  Start to weave your materials into the structure. In and out, in and out.

c. Tate

Starting the weave with tissue paper c. Tate

Make sure you warp and weft. So that’s some material going up the structure and other material going across.

c. Tate

Then wefting with felt c. Tate

c. Tate

Completed artwork! c. Tate

Step 4: Once you have completed your structure celebrate your textile woven masterpiece by placing it or hanging it somewhere interesting!

c. Tate

Try and take a photo with contrasting backgrounds c. Tate

c. Tate

Put it in a tree! c. Tate

c. Tate

Or next to other artwork! ;) c. Tate

Remember we want to see what you make! Submit pictures of your art work via email – kids@tate.org.uk – (or your parents, guardians and teachers can tweet it at us using #textiletryouts!) and then we will showcase a selection of your artworks here on Tate Kids and you can comment on the artworks made by other children all over the world! We have a few Terms and Conditions that go along with this which we’d recommend having a look at.

If you like this tryout, you’ll love our other ones too!

Textile Tryout 1: Out into the world

Textile Tryout 2: Wrapping up the impossible

PS: Our artist Sarah Sanders will be back in a few weeks with her next Textile Tryout!

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

No comments, Add your comment »

Behind the Scenes: Tate Kids presents Pop Art

Posted 6 January 2015 by Kat

Hi guys!

Over the past few months Tate Kids has been working on a new film for you guys which has now officially been released!

We know that a lot of you love Andy Warhol in My Gallery and the Blog. We thought you might like to know a bit more about Pop Art – and it might even be useful for that pesky homework! ;)

The star of the film is Ellie who you’ll see in the behind the scene shots below! We filmed up at Tate Liverpool at the Transmitting Andy Warhol exhibition! We worked with Short Form Film to make the video who had the fancy equipment to shoot and edit it. They also had an amazing animator that made the Warhol-inspired drawings and stop-motion footage! We hope you like it!

Lights! Camera! Action! c. Tate

Lights! Camera! Action! Reading for her close up! c. Tate

Got to get the microphone on! c. Tate

Got to get the microphone on! c. Tate

Lots of crew trying to get the perfect shot! c. Tate

Lots of crew trying to get the perfect shot! c. Tate

We hope you enjoy the film! Share with friends and let us know what you think of it in the comments!

2 comments, Add your comment »

TOP 5 RIDICULOUS CHRISTMAS PRESENTS

Posted 22 December 2014 by Kat

We all get those terrible Christmas presents. From that itchy sick-green scarf knitted by your Gran to that 500-paged book on fishing that you are never going to read. Just me then…?

Well, how about ridiculous presents? Fancy having the artworks below wrapped up under the tree, waiting for you on Christmas morning?

1. David Batchelor, I Love King’s Cross and King’s Cross Loves Me

6 coloured rectangles on wheels. What more could you ask for? They would make excellent sledges! The artist David Batchelor loves colour and explores it in lots of different ways. Have you thought about colour? Really thought about colour? Batchelor thinks about colour in the city. Next time you are on a walk, have a look around you. What colours can you see? Are there any rectangles of colours?

David Batchelor, I Love King’s Cross and King’s Cross Loves Me, 8 2002–7 © David Batchelor c. Tate

David Batchelor, I Love King’s Cross and King’s Cross Loves Me, 8 2002–7 c. Tate © David Batchelor

2. Lynda Benglis, Quartered Meteor

Ew! That isn’t very pretty! I wonder how this could even be wrapped up?

The artist Lynda Benglis, made this slippy looking sculpture out of lead and steel! I wonder what it feels like. Benglis makes this look soft and sloppy while actually being really hard. Clever!

Lynda Benglis, Quartered Meteor 1969, cast 1975 c. Tate

Lynda Benglis, Quartered Meteor 1969, cast 1975 c. Tate

3. Ai Weiwei, Sunflower Seeds

What are you going to do with all those seeds? Plant them? Well actually that wouldn’t be that useful as these ‘seeds’ are actually made out of porcelain! Each ‘seed’ was individually made by hand! That’s a lot of work!

Ai Weiwei, Sunflower Seeds 2010 c. Tate

Ai Weiwei, Sunflower Seeds 2010 c. Tate

4. Damien Hirst, Mother and Child (Divided)

Yes, they are real cows! Hope you like it! I think it would look great in your bathroom! Damian Hirst thinks a lot about death and religious imagery. What do you think these cows are about?

Damien Hirst, Mother and Child (Divided), exhibition copy 2007 (original 1993) c. Tate

Damien Hirst, Mother and Child (Divided), exhibition copy 2007 (original 1993) c. Tate

5. Do Ho Suh Staircase-III

Yes, that’s a red staircase hanging in your living room. Wow!

This staircase is a copy of Do Ho Suh’s staircase in his flat. Does it look the same as the stairs in your house or at school?

Do Ho Suh’s art shows us different types of spaces. What happens on stairs? You’re either going up or down them. Where are you going? What if you stopped half way down the stairs? Where would you be?

Do Ho Suh Staircase-III 2010 c. Tate

Do Ho Suh Staircase-III 2010 c. Tate

All these art works would make great gifts even if they would be a little silly to wrap up!

What’s the silliest present you have received?
Is there anything in the Tate collection that you would love to find under your tree?
What ridiculous Christmas present would you love to give? Let me know in the comments below!

I wouldn’t mind one of these for me and my friends…! ;)

Simon Starling, Five-Man Pedersen (Prototype No.1) 2003 c. Tate

Simon Starling, Five-Man Pedersen (Prototype No.1) 2003 c. Tate

Happy Holidays guys!

Tags: , , , ,

3 comments, Add your comment »

 

Subscribe to Tate Kids Blog