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WHO IS…PAUL NASH?

Posted 5 January 2017 by Kat

Who is he?

Paul Nash is one of the most important British artists of the early twentieth century. Let’s meet him!

Black and white negative, Paul sketching [Whiteleaf?] date not known, Tate Archive, © reserved

Photographer unknown, Black and white negative, Paul sketching [Whiteleaf?] date not known, Tate Archive, © reserved,

What is he most famous for?

Born in London in 1889, he is most famous for his landscape paintings, which look mysterious and sometimes slightly spooky.

Paul Nash, Pillar and Moon 1932–42, c. Tate

Paul Nash, Pillar and Moon 1932–42, c. Tate

The features in his landscapes often seem to be more than just a tree or a hill. They have characteristics that make them look like animals, people, or other strange creatures. When he was young Paul Nash was fascinated by a group of tall elm trees that grew at the end of his garden. These trees were very old and he thought they looked as if they were ‘hurrying along stooping and undulating like a queue of urgent females with fantastic hats’.
Do you ever look at things in the landscape like gnarled tree trunks or clouds (like below) and think they look like animals, people or monsters?

Paul Nash, Flight of the Magnolia, 1944, c. Tate

Paul Nash, Flight of the Magnolia, 1944, c. Tate

Look at the picture below. It looks like a beach inhabited by a very weird bunch of sunbathers! How do you think he made it?

Paul Nash, Swanage c.1936, c. Tate

Paul Nash, Swanage, c.1936, c. Tate

That’s right – he used collage. He collaged photographs of sticks and other bits of nature. (You could have a go at making your own eerie Paul Nash inspired landscape by sticking photos of twigs, leaves and other natural objects with funny shapes to a drawing or photograph of a landscape).

Where did his ideas and style come from?

There were two big things that influenced Paul Nash: abstract art and surrealism.

Abstract art is art that doesn’t try to show accurately how something looks. Artists change how things look to create a particular feeling or emotion. Sometimes they do this by using unexpected colours, shapes or messy brush marks or by changing the perspective and adding objects that look odd.

Do you think this picture looks like a real scene? What words would you use to describe it? How has Paul Nash made the landscape look a bit strange?

Paul Nash, Landscape at Iden, 1929, c. Tate

Paul Nash, Landscape at Iden, 1929, c. Tate

The ideas of the surrealists also influenced Paul Nash’s style. The surrealists were a group of artists who, in the 1920s began to make art and creative writing inspired by thoughts that are hidden deep in our brains – that we might not even know we have!

They were interested in the ideas of a famous psychologist called Sigmund Freud. A psychologist is someone who investigates people’s minds and tries to understand how they think. Freud called these hidden thoughts ‘the subconscious’. Sometimes these hidden thoughts appear in our dreams.

Anything else we need to know?

During both the First and Second World Wars Paul Nash was an official war artist. A war artist is someone paid by the government to paint or draw events that were happening in the war.

Paul Nash’s paintings didn’t just document the war in a straightforward way. In this painting, the huge red watery sunset adds a powerful feeling of sadness to this scene of a crashed plane.

Paul Nash, Bomber in the Corn, 1940,.

Paul Nash, Bomber in the Corn, 1940, c. Tate

Would you like to see a pile of dead monsters?

Paul Nash, Totes Meer (Dead Sea), 1940–1 c. Tate

Paul Nash, Totes Meer (Dead Sea), 1940–1 c. Tate

This is one of the most famous paintings Paul Nash painted during the Second World War. It looks a bit like the sea with spiky silvery waves doesn’t it? He called the painting Totes Meer (which is German for Dead Sea). Can you work out what is piled up in this graveyard?

Paul Nash called them ‘enchanting monsters’…

Look closely, can you see wings and wheels? The ‘waves’ are in fact lots of crashed and broken aeroplanes. Look even more closely and you might see a ghostly white bird flying in the sky…

So, Paul Nash liked dreams, landscapes, magic and the surreal! Let us know what you think about Nash in the comments. Make your own imaginary landscape using materials at home or on the My Imaginary City game.

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DIY CHRISTMAS: Lolly stick sledge decorations

Posted 20 December 2016 by Kat

It’s the festive season. It’s cold outside. It’s time to get crafty!

Use all your saved up lolly sticks and make yourself a tiny 3D sledge! Just follow these really easy steps!

What you need:
Lolly pop sticks
PVA glue
Pegs
Paint and paintbrushes
String/ribbon

Step 1.

Glue 4 lolly pop sticks together. Keep them together by using pegs and leave to dry. Make the base of the sledge using 3 lolly pop sticks.

 

Step 2.

Check out some of the artworks on Tate Kids and take inspiration by some of the amazing artworks in the Tate Collection!

I chose some paintings to base my designs on, such as this Bridget RileyJackson Pollock, and Joan Miró!

Step 3.

After the paint has dried, glue in 2 other lolly pop sticks to make your sledge 3D! Keep these upright with more pegs and leave to dry.

Step 4.

Loop string or ribbon around the top of the sledge and hang up!

Feeling inspired? If you make your own sledge or any of your own Christmas crafts, we’d love to see them! Send us your pictures by emailing: kids@tate.org.uk, sharing them on My Gallery, or get a grown up to tweet @tate_kids!

Happy Holidays!

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TOP 5 RIDICULOUS CHRISTMAS PRESENTS

Posted 5 December 2016 by Kat

We all get those terrible Christmas presents. From that itchy sick-green scarf knitted by your Gran to that 500-paged book on fishing that you are never going to read. Just me then…?

Well, how about ridiculous presents? Fancy having the artworks below wrapped up under the tree, waiting for you on Christmas morning?

1. David Batchelor, I Love King’s Cross and King’s Cross Loves Me

6 coloured rectangles on wheels. What more could you ask for? They would make excellent sledges! The artist David Batchelor loves colour and explores it in lots of different ways. Have you thought about colour? Really thought about colour? Batchelor thinks about colour in the city. Next time you are on a walk, have a look around you. What colours can you see? Are there any rectangles of colours?

David Batchelor, I Love King’s Cross and King’s Cross Loves Me, 8 2002–7 © David Batchelor c. Tate

David Batchelor, I Love King’s Cross and King’s Cross Loves Me, 8 2002–7 c. Tate © David Batchelor

2. Lynda Benglis, Quartered Meteor

Ew! That isn’t very pretty! I wonder how this could even be wrapped up?

The artist Lynda Benglis, made this slippy looking sculpture out of lead and steel! I wonder what it feels like. Benglis makes this look soft and sloppy while actually being really hard. Clever!

Lynda Benglis, Quartered Meteor 1969, cast 1975 c. Tate

Lynda Benglis, Quartered Meteor 1969, cast 1975 c. Tate

3. Ai Weiwei, Sunflower Seeds

What are you going to do with all those seeds? Plant them? Well actually that wouldn’t be that useful as these ‘seeds’ are actually made out of porcelain! Each ‘seed’ was individually made by hand! That’s a lot of work!

Ai Weiwei, Sunflower Seeds 2010 c. Tate

Ai Weiwei, Sunflower Seeds 2010 c. Tate

4. Damien Hirst, Mother and Child (Divided)

Yes, they are real cows! Hope you like it! I think it would look great in your bathroom! Damian Hirst thinks a lot about death and religious imagery. What do you think these cows are about?

Damien Hirst, Mother and Child (Divided), exhibition copy 2007 (original 1993) c. Tate

Damien Hirst, Mother and Child (Divided), exhibition copy 2007 (original 1993) c. Tate

5. Do Ho Suh Staircase-III

Yes, that’s a red staircase hanging in your living room. Wow!

This staircase is a copy of Do Ho Suh’s staircase in his flat. Does it look the same as the stairs in your house or at school?

Do Ho Suh’s art shows us different types of spaces. What happens on stairs? You’re either going up or down them. Where are you going? What if you stopped half way down the stairs? Where would you be?

Do Ho Suh Staircase-III 2010 c. Tate

Do Ho Suh Staircase-III 2010 c. Tate

All these art works would make great gifts even if they would be a little silly to wrap up!

What’s the silliest present you have received?
Is there anything in the Tate collection that you would love to find under your tree?
What ridiculous Christmas present would you love to give? Let me know in the comments below!

I wouldn’t mind one of these for me and my friends…! 😉

Simon Starling, Five-Man Pedersen (Prototype No.1) 2003 c. Tate

Simon Starling, Five-Man Pedersen (Prototype No.1) 2003 c. Tate

Happy Holidays guys!

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Happy Halloween!

Posted 26 October 2016 by Kat

Creeeeeakkk….BOO!

Scared you right?! As you dress up as ghosts, witches and your favourite artworks (!?) we wanted to showcase some of the great Halloween-inspired creations made on the Games and uploaded onto My Gallery.

Get ready to be spooked!

Halloween By Marti from Norway

Halloween, By Marti from Norway

The Rising Dead, By Madz from Blackpool

The Rising Dead, By Madz from Blackpool

Pow, By Bez from New Zealand

Pow, By Bez from New Zealand

Haloween, By Mollie from England

Halloween, By Mollie from England

Monster, By Vicktoria from Norway

Monster, By Vicktoria from Norway

Hallowen, By White Angel from Norway

Halloween, By White Angel from Norway

Halloween, By Rutty Frutty, from Norway

Halloween, By Rutty Frutty, from Norway

We love seeing what you are making in the Games, keep up the spooky work!

Happy Trick or Treating guys!

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WHO IS…HILLA BECHER?

Posted 22 July 2016 by Kat

Why do we take photographs? Sometimes to capture something amazing – fireworks or a beautiful crazy sunset; or perhaps to remember something – like a fantastic day out with friends.

Now look at these photographs taken by German artist Hilla Becher and her husband Bernd. What do you think about them?

Bernd Becher and Hilla Becher, Pitheads, 1974, © Estate of Bernd Becher & Hilla Becher

Bernd Becher and Hilla Becher, Pitheads, 1974, © Estate of Bernd Becher & Hilla Becher

I bet you’re thinking: ‘How can such matter-of-fact photographs of boring buildings be art?’

Don’t worry this is what lots of people thought when they first saw these photographs. But when you find out about Hilla Becher they make much more sense!

Who was she?

Hilla was born in 1931 in Siegen, Germany. From a young age she was interested in photography so her mum (who was a photographer) bought her a really nice camera. Her first job was working as an assistant to a very old-fashioned photographer. He used ancient cameras and nineteenth century techniques. But rather than thinking ‘Uh-oh get me out of here!’, Hilla realised that she could learn a lot of useful skills from him. Which she did! She learnt how to take amazing, detailed photographs.

Hilla met Bernd Becher in 1959. He was a painting student fascinated by industrial buildings. But he didn’t feel that paint could properly capture these fantastic structures. Luckily Hilla was on hand to help! She showed him how to take perfect photographs that captured every detail. From then on they collaborated: travelling around the world for the next 40 years and photographing over 200 industrial buildings including coal bunkers, winding towers, pitheads and factories.

Bernd Becher and Hilla Becher, Water Towers, 1972–2009, © Estate of Bernd Becher & Hilla Becher

Bernd Becher and Hilla Becher, Water Towers, 1972–2009, © Estate of Bernd Becher & Hilla Becher

Why industrial buildings?

Hilla and Bernd loved the design of these buildings – as everything about them was functional. An exhibition of their photographs in 1969 was called Anonymous Sculptures. This tells us something about how they saw these structures. They saw them as huge sculptures with strong impressive shapes. The structures have been compared to minimalist sculptures such as those by Donald Judd. In fact people often refer to the Bechers’s photographs as sculptures!

Donald Judd, Untitled, 1972, © Donald Judd Foundation/VAGA, New York and DACS, London 2016

Donald Judd, Untitled, 1972, © Donald Judd Foundation/VAGA, New York and DACS, London 2016

But as well as showing us their hidden beauty, the Bechers wanted to make sure that the buildings are remembered. As, unlike sculpture, these structures are knocked down when they are no longer needed. In fact many of them have already disappeared.

How did Hilla and Bernd create their photographs?

Hilla and Bernd photographed each building in exactly the same way: always on cloudy days (so there were no shadows); always from the same angles; and always in black and white (and never with any people)! They then made groups of photographs that showed the same type of structure. By doing this they created a pattern of shapes and forms.

Bernd Becher and Hilla Becher, Blast Furnaces, 1969–95, © Estate of Bernd Becher & Hilla Becher

Bernd Becher and Hilla Becher, Blast Furnaces, 1969–95, © Estate of Bernd Becher & Hilla Becher

They loved the rhythm created by these groups, as Hilla said:

‘By placing several cooling towers side by side something happened, something like tonal music; you don’t see what makes the objects different until you bring them together, so subtle are their differences.’

The point of photography is to ‘take a long look’ at something. And this is exactly what the Bechers’ photographs let us do. They don’t use arty effects or filters or unexpected angles. They just let the structures do the talking.

What did people think about their work?

At first other photographers and curators didn’t get the Bechers’ work and didn’t understand why it was art. But some of the greatest art can’t always be explained…and people soon recognised that these photographs were extraordinarily beautiful. In fact Hilla and Bernd’s matter-of-fact ‘show it how it is’ style has inspired lots of contemporary photographers including Andreas Gursky and Thomas Struth.

Thomas Struth Shinju-ku (Skyscrapers), Tokyo 1986 1986, © Thomas Struth

Thomas Struth, Shinju-ku (Skyscrapers), Tokyo 1986 1986, © Thomas Struth

What do you think now?

You could say that Hilla and Bernd were doing exactly what we do when we take a photograph. She was using photography to capture something amazing and awe-inspiring – and also recording and remembering.

Next time you see a huge old industrial building, take a long look. Is there anything beautiful or amazing about it…(Its shapes, its sheer size or perhaps a detail)? Photograph it…as it may not be there next time you’re passing!

You can see Hilla’s work in the flesh at Tate Modern now! Let us know what you think in the comments.

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