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Competition time! Win our new Noisy Neighbours app!

Posted 22 July 2014 by Kat

Hello everyone!

We are very excited because we have just launched our brilliant new app, ‘Noisy Neighbours’.

Noisy Neighbours app

Noisy Neighbours app

Meet Sid the snail is search for some peace and quiet in his noisy garden. Journey along with him and meet some chirping sparrows, singing foxes, and buzzing bees. You can even fill the garden with your own creations, by drawing new characters and recording sounds for them.

We have a competition to win the Noisy Neighbours app!

If you’re a budding photography and love nature take a picture of the wildlife in your garden and either:

Email it to kids@tate.org.uk with your name, contact details and a description of the photograph or
Get a grown up to tweet it to @tate_kids and tag it with the hashtag #noisytate and write what it is a picture of. 

We will then put all the entries into a hat and will then pick 3 of them to get a free app each! If a grown up submits your photograph via Twitter we will direct message them with instructions about how to get the app, if you win.

So whether it’s a picture of your fluffy cat in the grass or a beautiful butterfly on a sunflower send us your pictures to see if you can win!

We are looking forward to receiving your entries! Good luck!

Now here’s something for your adults to read: 
Prize is a free download of the Noisy Neighbours app from the App Store on iTunes (3 available to win). The competition is open from 15th July 2014 until 4th August 2014. Entries must be received by midnight on 4th August 2014. The competition is organised by Tate Digital and Tate Publishing. The prize is as described and there is no cash alternative. No other expenses are included as part of the prize. Only one entry per person is permitted. Photographs must be taken by children between 5 – 12 years old. The competition is not open to employees of Tate or Tate Enterprises Limited. Tate reserves the right to cancel the competition at any stage if deemed necessary

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Who is…Kazimir Malevich?

Posted 16 July 2014 by Kat

Meet Kazimir Malevich (1879-1935), a Russian artist whose radical artwork tells one of the most important stories in modern art. 

Kazimir Malevich Self Portrait 1908-1910  © State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow

Kazimir Malevich Self Portrait 1908-1910 © State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow

He started his life as an artist painting Russian landscapes, farming and religious scenes. He lived during the First World War and the Russian Revolution.

Kazimir Malevich Harvesting Study for a painting, 1928-1929 © State Russian Museum St Petersburg

Kazimir Malevich Harvesting Study for a painting, 1928-1929 © State Russian Museum St Petersburg

He invented a style of art called Suprematism, a visual language of simple shapes and colours. He used squares, circles and rectangles and only used a few colours to make his artwork. Suprematism was about seeing and feeling art in a new way. Just because he used a few colours and shapes, doesn’t mean his art is impersonal or cold. The trace of the artist’s brush strokes are visible in the paint and the slight change of colour on the canvas.

Dynamic Suprematism 1915 or 1916 by Kazimir Malevich 1879-1935

Kazimeir Malevich, Dynamic Suprematism 1915 or 1916

Don’t you think that the shapes above look like they are floating or falling? Why do you think he did this?

His most famous piece was the Black Square.

Kazimir Malevich Black Square 1913  © State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow

Kazimir Malevich Black Square 1913 © State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow

By reducing painting to a simple shape and a single colour, Malevich removed all the things art had always been about (such as animals, people, food and landscapes). That was why it was so radical at the time! Black Square became one of the most important works of modern art. It was so special that the painting was revealed to the world after months of secrecy and was hidden again for almost 50 years!

Kazimir Malevich Suprematism 1915 © State Russian Museum, St Petersburg

Kazimir Malevich Suprematism 1915 © State Russian Museum, St Petersburg

Malevich’s colourful abstract art still inspires and puzzles people today. So, what do you think? What do you feel when you look at the Black Square? Why not make your own Malevich-inspired artwork using the Tate Kids painting Games?

Malevich is open at Tate Modern from 16 July until 26 October 2014. Under 12s go free!

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Tate Kids meets Folk Art: Round up

Posted 9 July 2014 by Kat

Last weekend Tate Kids were involved in the Folk Art Makers Weekend at Tate Britain. In the morning we had families come in and play on the great Tate Kids games in the Digital Studio. We were inspired by the British Folk Art exhibition and made some great creations using Spin, Air Brush and Street Art.

Nessie

Thinking about storytelling and myths, Olivia and Natasha drew a stripey Nessie.

Smiling Sun

Looking at the trade signs, Niko, aged 6, created a very bright Smiling Sun. 

Later on in the day, young makers made patches using e-textiles with artist, Emilie Giles from codasign.

05_07_14_handmade_digtal_08_photo_sinker_BLOG

There are lots of collages, patchworks and textiles in the exhibition and we used these artworks as inspiration to make our own digital patches. We thought about our favourite hobbies and the stories we could tell on our patches. Everyone made excellent unique artworks!

05_07_14_handmade_digtal_03_photo_sinker

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Final patch

We even got to make music with circuit boards and bananas!

Bananaa

It was a very exciting day as it was the first time using our Digital Studio for kids and families, and we got some great feedback! We will hopefully be running more events like this in the Digital Studio in the future, so keep an eye out! To find out more about what’s going on at all the Tate galleries, visit our family events page.

Maybe this has inspired you to make your own patchwork? What story would you tell?

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WHO IS … PIET MONDRIAN?

Posted 2 July 2014 by Becs

Piet Mondrian is a Dutch artist known for making paintings that are abstract. Art that is abstract does not show things that are recognisable such as people, objects or landscapes, and instead artists use colours, shapes and textures to achieve their effect. Plus, did you know Mondrian was passionate about dancing? It is said that he disliked slow traditional dances like the Tango, but enjoyed high energy, fast dancing styles!

When Mondrian made his paintings, he would always mix his own colours, never using the paint directly out of a tube. In his work, you will see that he often works with primary colours, red yellow and blue, like in this piece:

Piet Mondrian Composition C (No.III) with Red, Yellow and Blue © 2007 Mondrian/Holtzman Trust c/o HCR International, Warrenton, VA

Piet Mondrian Composition C (No.III) with Red, Yellow and Blue © 2007 Mondrian/Holtzman Trust c/o HCR International, Warrenton, VA

Mondrian did not use a ruler to measure out his lines! He thought carefully about where to place lines, like those that you see in this piece here. Notice how the red, yellow and blue are often placed to the side, and the centres of paintings like this one are often without much colour.

Piet Mondrian Composition with Yellow, Blue and Red 1937-42© 2014 Mondrian/Holtzman Trust c/p HCR International

Piet Mondrian Composition with Yellow, Blue and Red 1937-42 © 2014 Mondrian/Holtzman Trust c/p HCR International

Mondrian took a big risk for his art. He left behind his home and country of the Netherlands in 1911, leaving behind the woman he was going to marry, to pursue his career as an artist in Paris. This is the artist himself in his studio.

Mondrian in his Paris studio in 1933 with Lozenge Composition with Four Yellow Lines, 1933 and Composition with Double Lines and Yellow, 1933 © 2014 Mondrian/Holtzman Trust c/o HCR International USA

Mondrian in his Paris studio in 1933 with Lozenge Composition with Four Yellow Lines, 1933 and Composition with Double Lines and Yellow, 1933 © 2014 Mondrian/Holtzman Trust c/o HCR International USA

Mondrian has also inspired the newly-designed family space at Tate Liverpool, where you and all of the family can play with colour, line and shape! This fun space, created by artist Michiko Fujii, is open until the end of the Mondrian exhibition.

Mondrian Family Room

Mondrian Family Room, Tate Liverpool

Plus, rumour has it that the café at Tate Liverpool is serving cake inspired by… Mondrian!

Cake 'inspired by Mondrian' at Tate Liverpool Cafe. c Tate Liverpool.

Cake ‘inspired by Mondrian’ at Tate Liverpool Cafe. c. Tate Liverpool.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mondrian and his Studios is open until 5 October 2014
Under 12s go free!
Throughout August there are My colourful pop up world activities at Tate Liverpool too!

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TOP 5 SUMMER SPORTS

Posted 30 June 2014 by Kat

Watching Wimbledon and the World Cup makes us want to go outside and play!

The sunny weather, green parks and beautiful beaches make it very easy to grab some friends and start a game. We’ve picked some of our favourite artworks to inspire and illustrate the great outdoor games of summer.

5. CRICKET

After Louis Philippe Boitard, An Exact Representation of the Game of Cricket c.1760

After Louis Philippe Boitard An Exact Representation of the Game of Cricket c.1760

It feels as though we’re looking down from high on a hill! They are wearing some very fancy outfits to get messy in! I think we’ll stick to shorts and trainers.

4. BADMINTON

William Roberts, Study for ‘Shuttlecocks’,  c.1934. © The estate of William Roberts

William Roberts Study for ‘Shuttlecocks’ c.1934. © The estate of William Roberts

That’s a lot of people playing in a small space! I wonder how long they can keep bouncing the shuttlecocks off their rackets for?

3. BASKETBALL

Howard Kanovitz, Basketball Pinboard, 1969.  © DACS, 2014

Howard Kanovitz Basketball Pinboard 1969. © DACS, 2014

The artist here uses a collage technique to make his artwork. Maybe you could take pictures of you and your friends playing sports this summer and make a collage of your own.

2. BOULES

William Roberts, Study for ‘Boule Players at Etretat’ 1976. © The estate of William Roberts

William Roberts Study for ‘Boule Players at Etretat’ 1976. © The estate of William Roberts

These French men look like they are concentrating really hard on the game. Notice the grid lines on the artwork; I wonder if the artist drew them before or after he drew the scene?

1. TENNIS

Lucien Pissarro, Contentment,  1890 © The estate of Lucien Pissarro

Lucien Pissarro Contentment 1890 © The estate of Lucien Pissarro

Quick! Is she going to make it!? This piece is called Contentment. I think that perfectly describes what it feels like playing tennis on a warm afternoon in the park. Do you agree? Or is there a better word to describe this painting?

What is your favourite summer sport? Next time you see someone playing a sport maybe try to draw or paint them. Could you even make an artwork out of playing a game or some tennis rackets and basketballs?

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