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TOP 5 EGGS

Posted 15 April 2014 by Becs

It’s the time of year when eggs, especially the chocolate variety, might be on your mind. But how have eggs been represented through art?

Primroses and Bird's Nest null by William Henry Hunt 1790-1864

Primroses and Bird’s Nest by William Henry Hunt 1790-1864

Some artists show eggs in their natural environment, for example you’ll see eggs in the delicate mossy nest in William Henry Hunt’s painting above. But look at the string of colourful eggs in Pierre Roy’s painting below, and we see eggs away from their home in nature, instead used as a wall hanging in a mysterious room of objects.

A Naturalist's Study 1928 by Pierre Roy 1880-1950  © ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2002

A Naturalist’s Study 1928 by Pierre Roy 1880-1950
© ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2002

Barbara Hepworth made the oval-shaped sculpture below using plaster and it feels like it would be smooth but heavy.

Oval Sculpture (No. 2) 1943, cast 1958 by Dame Barbara Hepworth 1903-1975 © Bowness, Hepworth Estate

Oval Sculpture (No. 2) 1943, cast 1958 by Dame Barbara Hepworth 1903-1975 © Bowness, Hepworth Estate

In this painting the artist has chosen to create a room that is simple and plain, allowing the different coloured eggs and their patterned dish to be the main focus.

The Eggs 1944 Sir Cedric Morris

The Eggs 1944 Sir Cedric Morris, Bt 1889-1982 Presented by Elizabeth David CBE 1992 © The estate of Sir Cedric Morris

This poster below of the truck carrying an egg was made for an exhibition in 1997. The theme of the exhibition was eggs.

The Eggman and his Outriggers 1997 Martin Kippenberger 1953-1997

The Eggman and his Outriggers 1997 Martin Kippenberger 1953-1997 Purchased 2005 © Estate Martin Kippenberger/Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne

Are you making any egg-inspired art or other Easter creations this week? If so, we’d love to see them on My Gallery.

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TOP 5 BIKES

Posted 20 March 2014 by Becs

From a boy on the beach with his two-wheeler, to a cycle that could carry five people, bikes are a favourite subject matter for a number of artists.

If you could draw your perfect bike, what would it look like? And where’s your favourite place to cycle? Maybe these bikes will give you some inspiration, so here are our top five bikes from Tate’s collection of art.

5. This bike has space for five people, but will it go five times faster?

Five-Man Pedersen (Prototype No.1) 2003 by Simon Starling born 1967 © Simon Starling

4. This young person takes a break from cycling to watch Michael and his friends gathering up old net on the beach.

Michael Balling Up Old Net 1984 by Laetitia Yhap born 1941 © Laetitia Yhap

3. This printed photograph has been shaped by the artist to appear uneven, to give the boy and his bike a wobbly appearance.

Stressed Photograph circa 1950 by Nigel Henderson 1917-1985 © Nigel Henderson Estate

2. Many people on bikes gather in the park on a summer’s day, painted in 1950.

Summer Eclogue No. 1: Cyclists 1950 by Robert Medley 1905-1994 © The estate of Robert Medley

1. This brightly coloured piece has a man and his bicycle at the centre. It was made using printing techniques on paper.

Outside Kampala 1966 by Julian Trevelyan 1910-1988 © The estate of Julian Trevelyan

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PHOTOS FROM BIG AND SMALL

Posted 7 March 2014 by Becs

Thank you to everyone who came to Tate Britain’s Big and Small family day on 21 February. We saw many new faces at the event, along with local families returning again to Big and Small.

Our photographers were kept busy all day! Here’s a selection of photos from the event – can you spot yourself in the action?

A girl gets involved with the cardboard and projectors installation at the Big and Small event

A girl gets involved with the cardboard and projectors installation at the Big and Small event

A toddler checks out his reflection in a mirror installation

A toddler checks out his reflection in a mirror installation

A boy gets involved with the cardboard and projectors installation at the Big and Small event

A boy gets involved with the cardboard and projectors installation at the Big and Small event

A family build and create with a stack blocks

A family build and create with a stack blocks

Two young people making art using the Tate Kids site

Two young people making art using the Tate Kids site

Tate Britain's Duveen Galleries taken over with tinfoil

Tate Britain’s Duveen Galleries taken over with tinfoil

A girl speaks into the microphone in a sound art installation

A girl speaks into the microphone in a sound art installation

A feedback card from a happy visitor!

A feedback card from a happy visitor!

 

 

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IT’S WORLD BOOK DAY! WHERE DO YOU LIKE TO READ?

Posted 6 March 2014 by Becs

6 March 2014 is World Book Day, a day that celebrates books, reading, authors, and illustrations!

Reading is also a popular subject in art, and many artists show the different ways people enjoy their books. Where do you like to read books?

Maybe you like reading together at home with your friends or family, like these two children here.

Mother and Children Reading circa 1860 by Arthur Boyd Houghton 1836-1875

Or maybe you prefer to read and relax on your bed, like this?

A. Top: Garco Robot Nailing a Wooden Box. Bottom: Little Boy on his Bed in his Room 1971 by Sir Eduardo Paolozzi 1924-2005

Maybe you enjoy big books in a quiet room!

A Boy Reading circa 1795 by Ramsay Richard Reinagle 1775-1862

Or maybe you like books with pictures, and read them at the desk like this young person and her mum

Picture Book 1967-71 by Henry Moore OM, CH 1898-1986

Let us know your favourite place to read in the comments below!

 

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TATE BRITAIN MEETS TOM AND JERRY

Posted 27 February 2014 by Becs

6 year-old Jude visited Tate Britain recently and made some drawings of the art he saw in the gallery. According to his mum Rachel who emailed us, Jude’s favourite cartoon characters are Tom and Jerry, so no wonder they also make an appearance in the drawings he made!

Thank you to Jude for these brilliant drawings, and to Rachel for emailing them in to Tate Kids. We hope you enjoy looking at them as much as we do.

6 year-old Jude’s drawing of a sculpture in Tate, featuring Tom and Jerry

Jude in action at Tate Britain

Tom and Jerry with Tate artworks, by Jude

Jude drawing in Tate Britain

More of Jude’s drawings

Another drawing by Jude

Drawings of sculpture and painting by Jude. Can you tell which artists he was drawing?

A final drawing by Jude

Jude and his book of drawings

Can you identify the works of art Jude has drawn?

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