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Lively Lines! Getting ready for the Big Draw!

Posted 22 October 2014 by Kat

Hello, my name is Sarah Marsh and I’m an artist who loves experimenting with drawing and mark making.

I sometimes draw using my sewing machine and I like to draw with bendy wire, black ink and found objects. Sometimes I make large spaces that people can step into, I also think of these as drawings.

I am inspired by artists like Eva Hesse, Cy Twombly, Shelagh Wakely and Phylida Barlow. Look at their use of line and colour. Eva Hesse has used cord to make her work, Twombly prints lines and Barlow has painted hers.

Eva Hesse, Tomorrow's Apples (5 in White), 1965 c. Tate

Eva Hesse, Tomorrow’s Apples (5 in White), 1965 c. Tate

Cy Twombly, The Song of the Border-Guard, 1952 c. Tate

Cy Twombly, The Song of the Border-Guard, 1952 c. Tate

Phyllida Barlow, Untitled, 1997 c. Tate

Phyllida Barlow, Untitled, 1997 c. Tate

Tate Liverpool has invited me to run the October Half Term workshops from Tuesday 28 to Friday 31 October. We are very lucky that the workshops will be on at the same time as The Big Draw; the worlds biggest drawing event!

I decided to call the workshops ‘Lively Lines’ and over the four days, we will be exploring drawing in lots of different ways. We will look and listen to artworks in the gallery, (keep an eye out for Len Lye’s ‘Free Radicals’ video art piece, which inspired my planning of the workshops), in the Family Art Dock we will make experimental art responses, whilst listening to beats and music and using drippy black and white ink, textural chalk and thick paint.

By taking our flat lines off the paper and transforming them into moving lines with wire, we will create a ‘sound sculpture’ in the Art Dock that we can all add to, over the four days we can watch our sculpture grow and change, turning into a big 3D drawing!

Sarah Marsh's wire drawings c. Sarah Marsh

Sarah Marsh’s wire drawings c. Sarah Marsh

On Friday 31 October we will celebrate the workshops with live drumming, whilst you make your lively marks. So come along and have some fun for this years Big Draw at Tate Liverpool!

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Sarah Marsh lives in Manchester and more of her work can be found on her fab website and Twitter. If you have any questions for Sarah, write them in the comments below. Thanks Sarah for writing a great blog for Tate Kids :)

Also, you lucky things! There is another Big Draw event at St Ives, so if you are in Cornwall and love to draw, check it out!

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Wig out! COMPETITION time!

Posted 20 October 2014 by Kat

Good Morning!

It’s that time again when you can win some super cool prizes!

The awesome new Tate Kids Activity Books are on sale from 6th November! Woop!

One is about amazing British artists like Barbara Hepworth and Cornelia Parker! The other is all about modern art and fabulous artists like Sophie Calle and Yves Klein!

They look great don’t they!?

Tate Kids Activity Book covers c. Tate

Tate Kids Activity Book covers c. Tate

To celebrate the launch of the books we are giving you the chance to win both these awesome books AND some brand new Tate Kids pencil crayons!

Tate Kids pencil crayons c. Tate

Tate Kids pencil crayons c. Tate

‘What is this competition then?!’ I hear you cry!

We want you to draw HAIR! We have a great section on the artist Ellen Gallagher in the Tate Kids Modern Art Activity Book. Notice that on the left there is space for you to draw an awesome hair style…

Page 27: Ellen Gallagher. Details from DeLuxe (2004-5) Artowrk and photo c Ellen Gallagher

Page 27: Ellen Gallagher. Details from DeLuxe (2004-5) Artwork and photo c Ellen Gallagher

We want you to draw the best, craziest, maddest hairstyle EVER!

It’s easy: DOWNLOAD THIS PDF

Then all you have to do is draw hair! Make sure you remember to name it. The crazier the better! Then you can either send us a photograph or a scan of your drawing. You can email it us with your contact details (so we can send you the prizes if you win) to kids@tate.org.uk or your grown-up can tweet it at us @tate_kids Remember to check out the Terms and Conditions before entering too.

Simple.

The winner will be chosen by the chap below. His name is James Lambert. He’s an illustrator, he draws A LOT and he drew all the illustrations for the book! Pretty cool guy.

James Lambert, Illustrator - he has GREAT hair!

James Lambert, Illustrator – he has GREAT hair!

The deadline for entries is Monday 10th November at 5pm. The winner will be announced on the Tate Kids blog on Friday 14th November.  So, what are you waiting for? Get drawing! Good luck! :)

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Textile Tryout 1: Out into the world

Posted 14 October 2014 by Kat

Hello my name is Sarah Sanders. I am an artist living in Manchester, UK and love combining text in live performances. Click on the picture below to see a video of me blowing on some letters I cut out of a newspaper a few years ago, for the Text Festival at Bury Art Gallery.

Sarah Sanders' Lettered Performance. Filmed by Geof Huth. 2011

Sarah Sanders, f e  ar, 2011. Filmed by Geof Huth.

For the Textile Tryouts I will be making 3 exciting activities you can try at home, in school or in your favourite place outside.

So what’s so special about text and what’s it got to do with art? Well, have you noticed how text….. is EVERYWHERE? You’re reading text right now, of course! It’s also on your packet of breakfast cereal, you can find it on posters you pass in the street and you can even find it flying above your heads, yes I’m talking about text on planes!

Here’s some text I get delivered to my house. Can you guess where this G came from?

 Artists love to use it too in their work. Check out these two artworks for example. This one has some newspaper in the picture …

Pablo PicassoBottle of Vieux Marc, Glass, Guitar and Newspaper 1913 © Succession Picasso/DACS 2014

Pablo Picasso Bottle of Vieux Marc, Glass, Guitar and Newspaper 1913 © Succession Picasso/DACS 2014

And this colourful text is actually painted by hand onto wood.

Bob and Roberta SmithMake Art Not War 1997 © Bob and Roberta Smith

Bob and Roberta Smith Make Art Not War 1997 © Bob and Roberta Smith

Some artists enjoy finding things that are already made in the world such as newspaper or text found on a signpost for example, and use them as materials for their own work. Have you seen Richard Tuttle’s Letters (The Twenty-Six Series)? I like them very much.

Richard Tuttle, 1966, Letters (The Twenty-Six Series), Nina and Gordon Bunshaft Bequest (by exchange) © 2014 Richard Tuttle. Source: MOMA, The Collection

Richard Tuttle, 1966, Letters (The Twenty-Six Series), Nina and Gordon Bunshaft Bequest (by exchange) © 2014 Richard Tuttle. Source: MOMA, The Collection

I used newspaper in my performance because I was questioning how stories are told in the media. Do stories in newspapers show the full picture? What do you think?

For the first activity of the Textile Tryouts, I’m going to show you how to make your very own text performance, inspired by text found around us.

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Now it’s your turn! Get involved in the first Textile Tryout!  

Once you’ve taken a photograph of your performance, we want to see it!

You can email it us on kids@tate.org.uk or get a parent, guardian or teacher to tweet @tate_kids using the #textiletryouts

We will then showcase some of the work here on Tate Kids!

If you have any questions for Sarah or comments about the Textile Tryouts, let us know in the comments below.

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Are you ready to Tryout?

Posted 1 October 2014 by Kat

Oi over here! Yes here! We are very excited here at Tate Kids because we have a very cool project coming to the blog and we want you to be equally, if not more excited!

*Drum roll please….*

We are starting a project called The Textile Tryouts!

What you need to know:
• There is a new art installation that is being made in the Tate Modern Turbine Hall by the artist Richard Tuttle. He will be very important in all of this.

• Richard Tuttle mainly likes 3 things: textiles (fabrics, materials like cotton and wool), text (words, poems, sentences) and the everyday (an interesting thing, which we will be looking into during the project).

We will be setting activities – we are going to call these ‘Tryouts’ that you can do at home or in the classroom which are all to do with textiles, text and the everyday. We will be exploring, weaving, performing, painting, drawing, climbing, sticking, writing, cutting and playing to make all different types of art!

• You will get to meet the artist Sarah Sanders and she will be setting some of her own ‘Tryouts’. You’ll get a great insight into how artists think and artistic processes!

We want to see what you make! We will be asking you to submit your art work via email – kids@tate.org.uk – (or your parents, guardians and teachers can tweet it at us using #textiletryouts!) and then we will showcase a selection of your artworks here on Tate Kids and you can comment on the artworks made by other children all over the world! We have a few Terms and Conditions that go along with this which we’d recommend having a look at.

Interested? Excited? We thought so! The first tryout will be up on 14th October! We’ll see you there!

We now have the first of the #textiletryouts – Out into the world – Check it out!

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What is…Surrealism?

Posted 24 September 2014 by Kat

Why has an artist painted a massive sunflower at the top of some stairs? What has a lobster got in common with a telephone? Why paint a fish flying?

Dali (one of the most famous Surrealists) once wrote, ‘I do not understand why, when I ask for a grilled lobster in a restaurant, I am never served a cooked telephone’.

Salvador Dalí, Lobster Telephone 1936, © Salvador Dali, Gala-Salvador Dali Foundation/DACS, London 2014

Salvador Dalí Lobster Telephone 1936, © Salvador Dali, Gala-Salvador Dali Foundation/DACS, London 2014

A bit confused? Don’t worry, so are we.

Let’s start at the beginning. Surrealism began in the 1920s. It was all about experimenting with your imagination. Surrealists looked at Sigmund Freud for inspiration. He thought and wrote about the mind, memories and human instincts.

Surrealists liked to put objects together, that were not normally seen together! Like a starfish and a shoe in this painting below by Marcel Mariën. How about drawing a tree with a scarf on or a squirrel with a monocle?

Marcel Mariën, Star Dancer 1991 © DACS, 2014

Marcel Mariën, Star Dancer 1991 © DACS, 2014

There are mainly 2 types of Surrealist artworks. The first is about dreams. Here is Paul Nash’s Landscape from a Dream. What do you think about when you look at it? Does it look like your dreams?

Paul Nash, Landscape from a Dream 1936–8 © Tate

Paul Nash, Landscape from a Dream 1936–8 © Tate

If you were to draw your dream what would it look like? Maybe you could make the landscape of your dreams on My Imaginary City?

Dorothea Tanning, Eine Kleine Nachtmusik 1943 © DACS, 2014

Dorothea Tanning, Eine Kleine Nachtmusik 1943 © DACS, 2014

The painting above looks a bit like a nightmare! Surrealist artists liked looking at dark subjects and things that couldn’t be easily explained. That girl looks like she has had a bit of a shock! What do you think is happening in this painting? I wonder what that light is coming through the door?

The second type of Surrealist artwork is called ‘automatism’. This is about doing things automatically without thinking, like doodling on a page or word-association. For example, when I say ‘green’ what do you think about? Grass? Grapes?

Here’s Joan Miró’s The Great Carnivore. It’s like a big doodle which he then created a monster from! Have you ever drawn a scribble and then tried to find characters in it?

Joan Miró The Great Carnivore 1969 © Succession Miro/ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2014

Joan Miró The Great Carnivore 1969 © Succession Miro/ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2014

Quite a bit of Surrealist artwork uses collage, like this artwork by Sir Roland Penrose.

Sir Roland Penrose, Le Grand Jour 1938 © The estate of Sir Roland Penrose

Sir Roland Penrose, Le Grand Jour 1938 © The estate of Sir Roland Penrose

If you were to cut up a magazine and then place the different images together, what kind of story could you tell?

Do you like Surrealism? Which Surrealist artist is your favourite? Do you have any other questions about Surrealism? Let us know in the comments below.

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